Weapon News

Weapon news is a great category to keep up to learn more about what is going on in the world dealing with weapons. Topics may include shooting, new weapons, banding, laws and etc. MTR Custom Leather likes to stay inform about today’s news regarding weapons.

Happy FLAG Day- What is it? WHY??

In the United States, Flag Day is celebrated on June 14. It commemorates the adoption of the flag of the United States on June 14, 1777, by resolution of the Second Continental Congress.[1] The Flag Resolution, passed on June 14, 1777, stated: “Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.”[2][3]

U.S. Flag Day
US Flag Day poster 1917.jpg

Poster commemorating the 140th Flag Day on June 14, 1917
Observed byUnited States
DateJune 14
Next timeJune 14, 2022
Frequencyannual

The United States Army also celebrates the U.S. Army birthday on this date; Congress adopted “the American continental army” after reaching a consensus position in the Committee of the Whole on June 14, 1775.[4][5]

In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation that officially established June 14 as Flag Day; on August 3, 1949, National Flag Day was established by an Act of Congress. Flag Day is not an official federal holiday. Title 36 of the United States Code, Subtitle I, Part A, CHAPTER 1, § 110[6] is the official statute on Flag Day; however, it is at the president’s discretion to officially proclaim the observance. On June 14, 1937, Pennsylvania became the first U.S. state to celebrate Flag Day as a state holiday, beginning in the town of Rennerdale.[1]New York Statutes designate the second Sunday in June as Flag Day, a state holiday.[7]

Perhaps the oldest continuing Flag Day parade is in Fairfield, Washington.[8] Beginning in 1909 or 1910, Fairfield has held a parade every year since, with the possible exception of 1918, and celebrated the “Centennial” parade in 2010, along with some other commemorative events. Appleton, Wisconsin, claims to be the oldest National Flag Day parade in the nation, held annually since 1950.[9]

Quincy, Massachusetts, has had an annual Flag Day parade since 1952 and claims it “is the longest-running parade of its kind” in the U.S.[10] The largest Flag Day parade had been held annually in Troy, New York until 2017, which based its parade on the Quincy parade and typically draws 50,000 spectators.[1][11][12]In addition, the Three Oaks, Michigan, Flag Day Parade is held annually on the weekend of Flag Day and is a three-day event and they claim to have the largest flag day parade in the nation as well as the oldest.[13] In Washington, D.C., Flag Day is celebrated heavily through the 7th and 8th Wards of the city. It is tradition in these wards to slow-smoke various meats and vegetables. It is said that Clyde Thompson is the “Godfather of Flag Day”.[why?]

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Guns in the News – Our Target is Gun News-THE EXPANSION OF CONSTITUTIONAL CARRY

THE EXPANSION OF CONSTITUTIONAL CARRY

Bureaucrats were never supposed to be in a position to make us ask—even to beg—for our constitutionally protected rights, as they can in jurisdictions with “may-issue” carry permit laws.

Thanks in no small part to lobbying from the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action, and to the many NRA members who stand behind the NRA by contacting their representatives, 20 states have now gotten bureaucrats out of the way by passing some type of “constitutional carry” (or “permitless carry”) legislation; in fact, four of these 20 states were added this year—Iowa, Montana, Tennessee and Utah.

This year’s expansion of American freedom began in Utah. Back in 2013, Utah’s legislature passed a constitutional-carry bill, but the victory was short-lived, as then-Utah Gov. Gary Herbert (R) vetoed the legislation. While Herbert continued to serve as governor, constitutional-carry advocates knew re-passing the bill would be futile.

But in January of 2021, Gov. Spencer Cox (R) was sworn in. Gov. Cox was a supporter of the constitutional-carry bill in 2013 when he was a state legislator, and he expressed support for this legislation when he ran for governor.

After some debate, the legislature passed the constitutional-carry bill again and Gov. Cox signed it, which made Utah the 17th to pass such legislation.

The Utah bill amends the Utah code pertaining to the penalties associated with incorrectly or illegally carrying concealed. Utah Code Section 76-10-504 is titled “Carrying concealed firearm—Penalties.” At the end of the list of offenses, the legislation adds this sentence: “Subsection 76-10-504(1) does not apply to a person 21 years old or older who may otherwise lawfully possess a firearm.”

Next up was Montana. After a robust debate, Gov. Greg Gianforte (R) signed H.B. 102 last February, allowing Montana residents to carry a concealed firearm for personal protection in most places in the state without first acquiring a permit from the government. Montana was then the 18th state to enact constitutional carry.

“Every law-abiding Montanan should be able to defend themselves and their loved ones. That’s why today, I’m signing H.B. 102 into law,” said Gov. Gianforte.

Bills similar to this one had passed both legislative chambers before in Montana, but were vetoed by previous governors. Not this time. Despite a disingenuous campaign by gun-control advocates, Montanans got bureaucrats out of the way of their freedom.

“Montanans should not have to seek government approval and jump through bureaucratic hoops in order to exercise their right to self-defense,” said NRA’s Montana State Director, Brian Gosch. “Gov. Gianforte recognized this and worked to codify these rights. The NRA thanks the governor and the bill’s prime sponsor, Rep. Seth Berglee, for sending a clear message: In Montana,​ self-defense rights are recognized and respected.”

Not long after, in April, following debate and lobbying from NRA-ILA, Iowa’s Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) signed House File 756, making Iowa the 19th state to enact a constitutional-carry law.

“Today, I signed legislation that protects the Second Amendment rights of Iowa’s law-abiding citizens while still preventing the sale of firearms to criminals and other dangerous individuals. This law also takes greater steps to inform law enforcement about an individual’s mental illness, helping ensure firearms don’t end up in the wrong hands. We will never be able to outlaw or prevent every single bad actor from getting a gun, but what we can do is ensure law-abiding citizens have full access to their constitutional rights while keeping Iowans safe,” said Gov. Reynolds.

In addition, Gov. Reynolds also signed House File 621 as a response to President Joe Biden’s (D) threat to repeal the federal law—the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act—that protects the firearms industry from frivolous lawsuits. With her signature on this bill, Gov. Reynolds ensures that Iowa has an additional layer of protection to prevent anti-Second Amendment extremists from attempting to bankrupt law-abiding businesses by suing them for third-party, criminal misuse of their legal products.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (R) 

“Constitutional carry ensures a barrier-free commitment to Second Amendment rights and is core to a strong public-safety agenda,” said Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee (R).

Then came Tennessee.
In Tennessee, faux-gun-rights organizations and gun-control activists attempted to derail the constitutional-carry bill with a large misinformation campaign, but the legislature nevertheless passed S.B. 765/H.B. 786 and sent this important measure to the desk of Gov. Bill Lee (R) for his signature. 

This Tennessee legislation allows any law-abiding adult who is legally eligible to obtain a carry permit to carry a handgun without first having to obtain permission from the government. It does not affect previously issued carry permits. Citizens may still obtain a permit so they may carry in other states that recognize Tennessee permits. As in other states, this legislation will ensure that Tennesseans aren’t left defenseless while waiting for government permission or wading through red tape. Tennessee Constitutional Carry will go into effect on July 1. When this happens, there will be 20 states with some type of constitutional-carry provision.

“Thank you to Gov. Bill Lee for leading the effort to strengthen Tennesseans’ right to self-defense. Also, thank you to bill sponsors Rep. William Lamberth and Sen. Mike Bell, as well as those legislators who voted in support of this important self-defense measure,” said NRA-ILA.

In each case, gun-control supporters claimed that removing the requirement for a concealed-carry permit would encourage criminals to illegally carry guns and to commit more crimes; they claimed this even though it hasn’t occurred in the many states that already have constitutional-carry laws. A 2019 study by the Journal of the American College of Surgeons, for example, details the impact of state concealed-carry laws over the last three decades and concludes: “This study demonstrated no statistically significant association between the liberalization of state-level firearm-carry legislation over the last 30 years and the rates of homicides or other violent crime.”

The spread of constitutional carry has clearly shown that American freedom isn’t a problem that needs to be solved. Finding the will and means to better enforce laws targeting criminal behavior, not the freedom of law-abiding citizens, is what’s clearly needed.

Article by Frank Miniter

Source: Guns in the News – Our Target is Gun News

Sig Sauer P320 X-Compact PRO 3.6″ 9MM 15RND LE PROGRAM – California Disavowed, LLC-What is the Difference between the Pro and standard Sig P320 X-Compact Series? 

SIG SAUER P320 X-COMPACT PRO 3.6″ 

The 320 X-Compact is the LE Professional version of the recently released X-Compact.  The main difference is the slide cutout which accepts the new R1-PRO optic and the upcoming R2 optic.   The rear sight on this gun remains in place when the sight plate is removed.  This is a 3 x 15 round magazine box.

These are currently in stock, no longer a preorder.  NOTE: the PRO has a different optics cutout than the photo.  Refer to the sales sheet to get an idea of the optics cut or look at the photo.

Description

Ergonomics and performance have become the standard of the P320 XSeries. Now, all of these features are available in an compact size. The P320 XCompact features a completely redesigned modular polymer XSeries grip with a reduced fastback carry cut and a low-profile internal magwell. Combined with the extended beavertail and high undercut trigger guard, the XCompact offers ultimate comfort and concealability AND improved recoil control. The 3.6” barrel and XSeries slide with enhanced serrations come equipped with the X-Ray3 day/night front sight with rear night sight plate assembly. The XCompact is fully compatible with the new ROMEO1PRO reflex optic and comes with THREE (3) 15-rd magazines. The P320 XCompact is the ultimate balance of form and function and redefines what compact pistols should be.

P320 XCOMPACT

P320 reliability and XSERIES performance in a new compact package.
P320 XCOMPACT
DETAILS
Ergonomics and performance have become the standard of the P320 XSeries. Now, all of these features are available in an compact size. The P320 XCompact features a completely redesigned modular polymer XSeries grip with a reduced fastback carry cut and a low-profile internal magwell. Combined with the extended beavertail and high undercut trigger guard, the XCompact offers ultimate comfort and concealability AND improved recoil control. The 3.6” barrel and XSeries slide with enhanced serrations come equipped with the X-Ray3 day/night front sight with rear night sight plate assembly. The XCompact is fully compatible with the new ROMEO1PRO reflex optic and comes with two (2) 15-rd magazines. The P320 XCompact is the ultimate balance of form and function and redefines what compact pistols should be.

Source: Sig Sauer P320 X-Compact PRO 3.6″ 9MM 15RND LE PROGRAM – California Disavowed, LLC

https://www.sigsauer.com/p320-xcompact.html

American Rifleman | New for 2021: Walther Arms PDP-New Walther Release 

 

Walther Arms has always been known for its incredibly comfortable, ergonomic handgun designs, and the latest model from the company launched in 2021 doesn’t disappoint on that front. The Walther Performance Duty Pistol (PDP) is an all-new lineup that incorporates some of the best features ever found in a Walther handgun.

One of the highlights of the Walther PDP is its milled slide, which is designed to accept a range of popular red-dot sights when used with the correct mounting plate. When you buy a Walther PDP, you’re entitled to a free mounting plate of your choice from Walther, which enables you to run the optic of your choice. As it comes from the factory, though, the milled slide cut is covered by a contoured cover plate that maintains the lines of the gun and gives you a clear view of the enhanced open sights.

Following the milled slide, the other story on the Walther Arms PDP is found in its ergonomics. In fact, the ergonomics of this gun are designed expressly for optimized use of a red-dot sight. The grip itself is contoured in such a way that it provides you with a natural aiming presentation, thanks to the position of your pinky finger and support hand. When you line the gun up with the target, that dot will drop right in your line of sight, enabling you to get shots of quickly and intuitively.

In addition to the grip contours, you’ll also find an enhanced grip texture on the Walther Arms PDP. The Performance Duty texture is an exclusive design from Walther, which incorporates geometric tetrahedrons that allow you to gain impressive grip without experiencing the irritation found on more aggressive stippling and texturing. On the slide, Walther’s incorporated what it calls SuperTerrain serrations, which have been raised above the flat plain of the slide to give you deeper cuts that promote control over your slide and give you greater grip.

Watch our American Rifleman New for 2021 video above to learn more about the Walther Arms PDP.

Walther Arms amped up its product offerings in 2021 with its PDP, an enhanced, duty-style semi-automatic with incredible ergonomics.

Source: American Rifleman | New for 2021: Walther Arms PDP

SPRINGFIELD ARMORY® ANNOUNCES HELLCAT® RDP™ 9MM

SPRINGFIELD ARMORY® ANNOUNCES HELLCAT® RDP™ 9MM

FEBRUARY 23, 2021

GENESEO, ILL. (2/23/21) – Springfield Armory® is proud to introduce an exciting new variant of its wildly popular micro 9mm Hellcat® — the Hellcat RDP™ (Rapid Defense Package). The RDP is replete with features that make this high-capacity, ultra-compact pistol even more versatile.

The new Hellcat RDP builds on the success and popularity of the original Hellcat OSP™ micro 9mm with the addition of a 3.8″ threaded barrel and an included Self Indexing Compensator. Compact and capable, the compensator vents gas from the barrel to significantly reduce muzzle rise and felt recoil. Made of lightweight 8082 aluminum, the compensator features a patented self-indexing mounting system that ensures the port is correctly oriented every time. That means it’s a breeze to install or remove with no need for shims or tools.

“The Hellcat reshaped the way people viewed what a CCW pistol can be. Now, the Hellcat RDP is taking the performance of this highly capable pistol to the next level,” says Steve Kramer, Vice President of Marketing for Springfield Armory.

Also debuting today is HEX™ optics by Springfield Armory. Direct-mounted on the slide of the Hellcat RDP is the all-new HEX Wasp™ red dot, utilizing the Springfield Micro™ footprint made popular by the Hellcat OSP. The ruggedly built, IPX7 waterproof-rated Wasp features an aluminum body and an anti-glare-coated glass lens, and its low-mount design means it can co-witness with the handgun’s fixed tritium/luminescent front sight and Tactical Rack U-Notch rear sight.

“We are excited about the introduction of HEX optics for the self-defense market. Built to the same standards of quality and performance you have come to expect from Springfield Armory, HEX precision crafted optics offer exceptional value and are backed by a lifetime warranty,” continued Steve Kramer.

The Hellcat RDP also features an optional low-profile ambidextrous manual safety located at the rear of the frame, and the new Gen 2 Hellcat trigger. This new trigger offers enhanced ergonomics for a wide range of hand sizes for an even more comfortable shooting experience.

With all these features plus the handgun’s impressive 11- and 13-round capacities, the Hellcat RDP is a formidable, cutting-edge self-defense firearm.

HELLCAT® 3.8” RDP™ 9mm |  HC9389BTOSPWASP

HELLCAT® 3.8” RDP™ 9mm, manual safety |  HC9389BTOSPWASPMS

For more information on the Hellcat RDP, visit: https://www.spr-ar.com/r/4497

For more information on HEX optics, visit: https://www.spr-ar.com/r/4499

 

About Springfield Armory®

In 1794, the original Springfield Armory began manufacturing muskets for the defense of our young, free Republic. The Armory functioned as a firearms supplier for every major American conflict until 1968 when the government sadly closed its doors. In 1974, nearly two centuries after its inception, Springfield Armory Inc. in Geneseo, Ill. revived the iconic heritage of the Armory to carry on its legacy.

We strive to honor this responsibility as guardians of the original Springfield Armory legacy by manufacturing the highest quality firearms to enable responsible citizens to preserve their right to keep and bear arms in the defense of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

With an unmatched emphasis on craftsmanship, performance and exceptional customer service, our mission is to forge superior firearms and provide the tools necessary to defend individual freedoms and equality for those who embrace the rights and principles secured by our Founding Fathers. For more information, please visit us at: springfield-armory.com.

Leather Holsters available at: www.mtrcustomleather.com 

The SIG SAUER P320MAX, a competition set-up built for a champion–READ MORE–MTR 

The P320MAX, a competition set-up built for a champion.
P320MAXP320MAX

 

Developed in partnership with Team SIG Captain Max Michel, the P320MAX is a 9mm striker-fired pistol optimized for competition at the highest level, specifically in the popular Carry Optics division. It features a completely redesigned slide, with custom wrap-around serrations delivering maximum grip for both side and top manipulation. The pistol also comes standard with the ultra-wide field of view ROMEO3MAX optic with 6MOA red dot, and (4) 21rd steel magazines.

P320MAX

 

The P320MAX, a competition set-up built for a champion.

P320MAX

P320MAX FEATURES

 

★ TXG Tungsten Infused Heavy Grip Module

★ Custom Works slide with official Max Michel logo and custom serrations

★ ROMEO3MAX 6MOA optic direct-mounted to slide

★ 5” Match Grade Bull Barrel

★ Solid one-piece guide rod compatible with 1911 recoil springs

★ (4) 21rd Steel Magazines

LEARN MORE AND FIND A DEALER

VIDEO: P320 MAX on the Range

Team SIG Captain Max Michel discusses the features and benefits of the new P320 MAX pistol.
WATCH THE VIDEO

 

 

‘Put the guns down, please’: Brother pleads for end to gun violence after sister’s death

Loubna Laassadi was shot and killed in a drive-by shooting in East Columbus. (Laassadi family)
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The brother of Loubna Laassadi, Mehdi Laassadi, called for an end to senseless killings that have now happened 130 times in Columbus this year.

His sister’s death marked the 128th homicide in Columbus this year.

“You never ever in your mind, in your life think that it would happen to you,” Mehdi Laassadi said.

Loubna Laassadi is known to many as “Lucy.”

Police said she was shot in an alleged drive-by shooting on East Broad Street early Sunday morning.

Mehdi said, according to a witness, the shooting was sparked by an exchange of words between his sister and a stranger who was stopped in the lane next to her.

“People need to learn to let stuff go. It’s sad that over the smallest thing people die. Now I know. I feel. My heart hurts for all the families, every single family out there that is missing a loved one, that has a loved one killed. It hurts,” Mehdi Laassadi said.

Police said she died at a nearby gas station where someone called for help.

Loubna Laassadi was just 25 years old.

“She loved music. She made songs. She loved to sing. She was just a joyful person. There was not one person that you did not ask about Lucy, and they would tell you she was just full of life, so happy, and always willing to help people,” Mehdi Laassadi said.

His plea is that everyone put down their guns before another life is taken.

“Just think about stuff, please. That’s what I want to tell them, man. Just think. Just think a couple seconds before you act,” Mehdi Laassadi said.

In the three days since Loubna Laassadi was killed, two others have been killed by gun violence.

“Put the guns down, please. Everybody, just put the guns down,” Mehdi Laassadi said.

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TNW Aero Survival Rifle Review

TNW Aero Survival Rifle Review

DeNiro found the 10mm ASR to be pleasant to shoot, and it fired all 10mm ammo without any malfunctions.

I became familiar with TNW many years ago. It was known for specialty items like its semi-auto MG-34 and semi-auto Browning 1919 belt-feds, as well as a modernization up-grade kit for semi- or full-auto 1919s called the M230. I ended up buying the M230 kit for my full-auto 1919 and nicknamed it “the Poor-Man’s M240.”

When TNW introduced the Aero Survival Rifle, I became interested, as the survivalist in me really takes a liking to anything that is multi-caliber capable, semi-auto, and has take-down features—the Aero has all three. The Aero is also available in a pistol version, and since, once again, we can place arm braces against our shoulders for stability, these would be great as a self-defense gun.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

The TNW Aero Survival Rifle in 10mm uses Glock magazines.

Let’s talk about survival for a bit. This issue of Firearms News is about hunting with MSRs, and hunting is something that any prepper or survivalist needs to have in his or hers quiver of skills. Can a pistol-caliber carbine feed your family in an emergency or only provide a snack for one? Well, Firearms News put the TNW Aero Survival Rifle to the test, and I picked the best guy I knew for the job: my son Matthew. He is a terrific hunter and has been shooting since he was about three or four years old.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

One thing you will notice about the Aero is that the lower receiver, specifically around the trigger guard, is a bit similar to an AR-15, but scaled down a bit. I’m not sure of the reason for this, but it does contribute to the firearm’s compact design as a take-down. When I sent my son in the woods with the Aero, he was 13 years old, and the scaled-down size fit him better even though he has had no issues with his AR-15 (and has been shooting that since he was about five years old). I chose the 10mm, as I wanted a cartridge that would take a deer but not something that would take my son out of the hunt like a .45-70.

TNW Aero Survival Rifle Review

DeNiro found the 10mm ASR to be pleasant to shoot, and it fired all 10mm ammo without any malfunctions.

I became familiar with TNW many years ago. It was known for specialty items like its semi-auto MG-34 and semi-auto Browning 1919 belt-feds, as well as a modernization up-grade kit for semi- or full-auto 1919s called the M230. I ended up buying the M230 kit for my full-auto 1919 and nicknamed it “the Poor-Man’s M240.”

When TNW introduced the Aero Survival Rifle, I became interested, as the survivalist in me really takes a liking to anything that is multi-caliber capable, semi-auto, and has take-down features—the Aero has all three. The Aero is also available in a pistol version, and since, once again, we can place arm braces against our shoulders for stability, these would be great as a self-defense gun.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

The TNW Aero Survival Rifle in 10mm uses Glock magazines.

Let’s talk about survival for a bit. This issue of Firearms News is about hunting with MSRs, and hunting is something that any prepper or survivalist needs to have in his or hers quiver of skills. Can a pistol-caliber carbine feed your family in an emergency or only provide a snack for one? Well, Firearms News put the TNW Aero Survival Rifle to the test, and I picked the best guy I knew for the job: my son Matthew. He is a terrific hunter and has been shooting since he was about three or four years old.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

One thing you will notice about the Aero is that the lower receiver, specifically around the trigger guard, is a bit similar to an AR-15, but scaled down a bit. I’m not sure of the reason for this, but it does contribute to the firearm’s compact design as a take-down. When I sent my son in the woods with the Aero, he was 13 years old, and the scaled-down size fit him better even though he has had no issues with his AR-15 (and has been shooting that since he was about five years old). I chose the 10mm, as I wanted a cartridge that would take a deer but not something that would take my son out of the hunt like a .45-70.

ADVERTISING
TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

Matthew DeNiro with the TNW Aero Survival Rifle in 10mm on the first day of youth deer hunting in Ohio for 2017. Matthew chose the Burris Fullfield 30 (TAC30) LRS 1x-4x 24mm scope with illuminated reticle for the hunt.

You see, we are in Ohio, and straight-walled rifle cartridges were just approved in 2014, for deer; before that it was shotgun slug only for a long arm. Matthew already had a few seasons with a .410-chambered AR-15 (see Scot Loveland’s article on the ATI Omni .410 AR-15 in this issue) and wanted to try something other than a shotshell slug. For the first couple of years of the new straight-walled-rifle cartridge law, the regulations cited specific cartridges only and many were rare, uncommon, almost obsolete, and mostly lever-action and/or single-shot calibers such as: .357 Maximum, .375 Super Magnum, .38-55, .45-110, .50-70, .50-110, etc. Sure, there were more common cartridges listed, like the .45 Long Colt, .44 Magnum, and .45-70, but I was looking for something in semi-auto and/or something that wouldn’t break either of my sons’ shoulders.

The part of Ohio that we hunt is near the West Virginia border and is hilly and heavily wooded, not only with trees, but also with thickets. Most shots are at 40 yards or less—a fast follow-up shot is really necessary in most cases, as deer can start to disappear just by running 10 feet deeper into the woods. The .45 Winchester Magnum was also on this early list, but there were no semi-auto rifles for this caliber, with the exception of M-1 Carbine conversions from the 1980s, and if these conversions were not done on a GI receiver or a quality commercial receiver, the result was breaking, catastrophic failure, and damaged rifles.

There is one company making an AR-15 in this caliber, and I almost went in this direction, but then the law changed (after complaints from many hunters, including myself), and Ohio deer season was opened up to any straight-walled rifle cartridges from .357 Magnum to .50 for use in a rifle. Glad that was over.

My other option before the specific-cartridge law was changed was an AR-15 pistol, as handguns can be in any caliber, as long as they are straight walled, and I was looking hard at this, with a cornucopia of calibers considered such as: .50 Beowulf, .50 AE, .45 Super, .460 Rowland, and others. The problem was that, at that time, the officials at ATF’s technology branch decided to change their minds and not allow the use of arm braces against the shoulder, so that dream was shattered (thankfully, the decision was later reversed). Anyway, I decided to go with the Aero rifle in 10mm as a short-distance, low-recoil, deer killer that my boys and I could use to fill the freezer. Before I tell you about my son’s deer hunt, let’s take a look at the rifle.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

All TNW Aero Survival Carbines come with threaded barrels with the common thread pitch and size for the chambered caliber.

The TNW Aero Survival Rifle is a multi-caliber, blowback, semi-auto carbine with a quick-change barrel. It is available in .22 LR, 9mm, .357 SIG, .40, .45 ACP, and 10mm, and there is an export version available in 9x21mm for those shooters in countries that do not allow military calibers for civilians (the Aero line will soon be available in .22 Magnum and .17 HMR). All TNW Aero rifles can be converted to any available caliber by changing the bolt, barrel, and lower grip assembly, so if you live in a state with firearm registration, you can change calibers without legal grief and without having to buy a whole new rifle and registering it.

 

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

DeNiro found that this technique—using the thumb and trigger finger—was the most comfortable and easiest when charging the 10mm configuration.

The trigger guard is a bit small, and someone with large hands may have an issue if using gloves. The trigger is spongy-feeling to me and breaks at about five pounds—it also has some sharp edges, but nothing that can’t be fixed with a Dremel tool. There are two ejection ports to allow for right- or left-handed ejection, and the video directions for this conversion are straight-forward, but this conversion is something that should be done on the work bench and not in the field, as tapping out very tight-fitting roll pins that hold the ejector in place is involved.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

The pistol magazine release is located on the left side of the magazine well, and the Aero uses all Glock magazines for centerfire cartridges. The magazine-release button uses a strong spring—I don’t have weak hands, but if you do, this may be a bit annoying. The good thing is that the release button is positioned in front of the mag well so that you can use your thumb to depress it while grabbing the magazine with your other four fingers. The 10mm Glock-type magazines drop free without a hitch if you choose to do so, but you will have to hold the rifle steady with your shooting hand or cradle the opposite side of the magazine well to overcome the stiff magazine-release button spring. Its safety is a simple cross-bolt design set to Western (or right-handed) standards—push left for fire and right for safe.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

Three potential deer-hunting 10mm rounds were chosen with help from the folks at Hornady and Federal: Hornady Custom 180-grain XTP, Hornady Critical Duty 17-grain Flex Lock, and Federal’s Trophy Bonded 180-grain JSP. Remington 180-grain FMJ was chosen for the range round.

The removable barrel at the receiver makes this a true take-down rifle. The rifle measured 295⁄8 inches (with stock collapsed) and only 17¾ inches with the barrel removed. All barrels are threaded in the common pitch for its particular caliber, and all come with a thread protector. There is a “Ma Deuce”-style barrel shroud, which also is the barrel nut, and this shroud does come in handy when things heat up, so it’s not just for looks.

 

It features an AR-15 buffer tube, which is put to use with its long bolt-carrier design, so the rifle cannot have a folding stock, but any AR-15 stock can be attached, and the one it comes with is a six-position collapsible with a nice rubberized pad. It also sports a TAPCO, FAL-style storage grip, which is perfect for spare survival items, spare parts for the gun, extra rounds, ear plugs, etc.

TNW-Aero-Survival-Rifle

Hornady came in first with its Critical Duty 175-grain Flex Lock rounds—1.47″ at 50 yards from the bench.

A 9½-inch Picatinney rail is included on top of the upper receiver, and there are holes drilled at the three-o’clock, six-o’clock, and nine-o’clock positions in the fore-end area to accommodate additional P-rails, if one so desires. I didn’t bother to mount the ones provided, as I didn’t need the rails for a hunting article. However, if you are blasting coyotes, you may want to add a rail for a light. The finish on our test sample is an OD green anodized aluminum, and you can also get the Aero in black, dark earth, pink, silver, and some custom colors and designs. No sights are included. At around six pounds, the rifle is very packable.

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(Left Photo): Editor Vincent DeNiro with TNW owner Tim Bero in his booth at SHOT Show 2018, taking a look at the deer kill by Matthew DeNiro with the Aero 10mm rifle. (Right Photo): The author’s son with his first deer kill of 2017. Here is proof that the 10mm TNW Aero Survival Rifle will feed the family!

One thing is noticeable when first loading the Aero. The bolt is not the easiest to charge, but with usage, it does lighten up quite a lot; this is a straight blowback 10mm.

At the range, I set up targets at 50 yards and began my testing sand-bag rested on a shooting bench. The optic I chose is a simple Weaver 2.5x-7x 28mm scope, which worked out perfectly. In the “old days,” back in the 1970s and 1980s, I usually picked 3x-9x variable-type scopes with simple crosshairs (holdover was a lifestyle) for almost everything I shot (bolt actions, AR-15s, M-1 Carbines, AKs, Mini-14s, UZI Carbines, etc.—not much available in optics then like there is today), so I felt right at home with Weaver. This scope is a great hunting choice.

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Although not included in the accuracy testing, LabRadar chronographed the lightweight 10mm Underwood Xtreme Defender 115-grain ammunition from the 16–inch Aero barrel at 1,926 fps! That’s 947 foot pounds of energy!

I used Remington 180-grain FMJ as my “plinking” load, and with an average of 1.9 inches, it is a great range round for this caliber. Hornady’s Critical Duty 175-grain Flex Lock produced the best groups at 1.47 inches, and Federal’s Trophy Bonded 180-grain JSP was on its heels with a 1.63-inch group. Most groups were in the 1.5- to 3.75-inch range, so accuracy is definitely there for larger game. You won’t have any issues shooting rabbits or coyotes either. With a 16-inch barrel, 10mm ammunition ranges from 600–1,000 foot pounds of energy at the muzzle, which is enough stopping power for small- to medium-sized deer at around 50 yards. Recoil was not bad, and I didn’t experience any malfunctions—the Aero ate all 10mm ammo without a hitch.

So, how did my son do? Well, he took the TNW Aero out for the 2017 youth-only deer gun hunting gun season, which is two days in November here in Ohio. Ohio only allows three rounds total for any firearm for deer, so I blocked the 10mm Glock magazine to hold only two rounds. About 10 minutes before sunset, on the last day, I heard a shot and started heading toward the hollow, which is his favorite hunting spot. He had watched and followed a small pack of four deer, which emerged from the hollow out onto a two-acre field. After hitting the deer with a shot between the flank and ribs area at about 35 yards, we pursued the deer about 75 yards into the woods, and with one more hit, it became 36 pounds of Venison Marsala and deer tacos for the freezer. Unfortunately, we are not sure which rounds it was struck with, so it’s a toss-up between the Hornady Critical Duty and the Federal Trophy Bonded, as those are the ones we chose for the hunt. Possibly it was both.

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Practicing off-hand shooting at 50 yards was enjoyable, and hitting steel at 100 yards was not difficult. Recoil from the 10mm blowback rifle was sharp but not uncomfortable, due in part to the large rubber pad included with the collapsible stock.

Now to the .22 LR conversion. One of the great things about this firearm is the ability to convert it to .22 LR. Not only is this great economical practice if you use the Aero for self-defense or hunting chambered in one of the more expensive calibers like .357 SIG or 10mm, it’s great for just fun plinking on a Saturday afternoon or for hunting small game.

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Field-stripping the Aero is pretty straight forward. Shown is the 10mm version.

A few things to note before we look at converting the rifle from 10mm to .22 LR. Remington model 597 30-round magazines, which are made of plastic, were very tight-fitting. So tight that I had to get out sandpaper and take off quite a lot of material from both sides of the upper magazine body, as well as polish up a bit of the inside of the mag well. After this, things went more smoothly, but not to the point where the plastic magazine would drop free, as that would take more work. I had no problems with the included 10-round 597 metal magazine —it drops free and fits perfectly in the TAPCO storage grip so you can always have an “emergency mag.” Pro-Mag also makes 22-round “banana” magazines, as well as a 70-round drum in the 597 configuration, but I did not have an opportunity to try either of those. Unlike the centerfire lower receiver, the magazine release is ambidextrous for the .22 LR version, with easily reachable magazine-release buttons on the left and right side that can be reached with a trigger finger.

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The TNW ASR in .22 LR uses any Remington Model 597-type magazine.

Switching Calibers —10mm To .22 LR (Deer To Squirrels)

This is just a quick rundown to give you an idea of how the conversion takes place (the way I did it), so refer to TNW instructional videos on its website.

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STEP 1: Be sure that the Aero is unloaded. Push the two retaining pins in the bottom of the lower receiver, and “jiggle” the lower free. The two pins are not captive, but have a spring-type c-clip to prevent them from walking out—both need to be fully removed.

STEP 2: Unscrew and remove 10mm barrel. You will notice that the bolt handle and bolt carrier will move forward, and this will allow you to remove the handle through the rounded portion of the channel that the bolt handle rides in on the right side of the upper receiver. Remove the bolt handle and allow the 10mm bolt to come forward, then remove it. The buffer and buffer spring will move forward, and these are not to be removed. (NOTE: They cannot be removed through the front of the receiver.)

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These are the components needed to convert any caliber TNW Aero to .22 LR.

STEP 3: Insert the .22 LR bolt assembly through the front of the upper receiver. Be sure to tilt the receiver downward a bit, as the firing pin will fall out of the back of the bolt, as it is not retained until the bolt handle is inserted. Push the bolt assembly to the rear of the receiver until its recoil spring begins to push against the centerfire buffer and buffer spring. Be sure that the firing pin is forward in the bolt, otherwise the bolt handle will not fully engage its hole. Insert bolt handle.

STEP 4: Insert barrel with the longest of the three channels, which rides along a hex-head bolt near the front of the upper receiver, at the chamber area, at the 12 o’clock position. Then, tighten the locking shroud all the way until you view a portion of the barrel in the front part of the ejection port (see photo). This is important, otherwise the ejector will not properly line up with the bolt when the lower receiver is installed.

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The 10mm bolt, on left, compared to the .22 LR bolt, on right. The 10mm bolt is also the same one used for .40 and .357 SIG.

STEP 5: Cock the hammer back to the firing position. Align two lugs on the upper receiver with the holes in the lower receiver/grip assembly. You will also need to align the ejector (shown sticking out of the grip assembly above the magazine release) with the channel in the bottom of the bolt. NOTE: You will also need to align the buffer ring with the roll pin, which protrudes out of the rear of the grip assembly.

As stated earlier, I really like the capability of switching calibers in a firearm, so I was very excited to see how the Aero would perform in .22 LR. I set the distance at 100 feet for a multitude of reasons, one of which being that this is a common distance for squirrel hunting in my over 40 years of experience in tagging these little animals. Before I got started on the shooting bench, I did some plinking and noticed something right away. The firing pin makes a small round footprint on brass instead of the typical “chisel” mark made by most .22 LR firing pins. This did seem to cause some issues with Winchester “white box” ammunition, resulting in many rounds not firing. Other ammunition didn’t seem to have this much of an issue, as the Winchester “white box” ammo did. When I rechambered the unfired “white box” ammo in other .22 LR firearms, it usually did fire.

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Sliding the AERO .22 LR bolt into the upper receiver.

This gun likes Federal copper-plated 36-grain HP rounds, as it ate them up when using the 10-round or 30-round Remington 597 magazines. The extractor works just fine IF the round goes off, but when I had a “dead” round, I had to lock the bolt back and manually remove it from the chamber. The trigger is a bit stiff and odd but was adequate for plinking.

With practice, I got used to the trigger and was able to quarter the bullseye dot on the Caldwell Orange Peel target with the Weaver scope set at 7x and hold it steady throughout the trigger pull, but this took some effort. The .22 LR trigger is much different from the “spongey” feel of the 10mm trigger and starts off a bit stiff and then drops to a first “stage” at about 50% of the travel distance as if it were a set trigger. Then, with about 75% of the effort and travel as the first pull, the hammer finally drops. I was able to get used to this and hold on target, but this is not the ideal trigger I would want to hunt or target shoot with. As they say, “you can get used to anything,” but I would look for other trigger upgrade options (or get out a Dremel tool) if this was my go-to small-game gun.

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Two retaining pins lock the lower to the upper and although they are not captive, they do incorporate a c-clip-type spring.

For the accuracy test, I decided on three five-shot groups for each ammunition type. I started with ELEY High Velocity 36-grain hollow point, which, as expected, shot accurately, with its best group at 1.16 inches. All of these rounds had perfect ignition, but for some reason, I had a failure to fully eject on the last round every time using the Remington 597 10-shot magazine. Next up was what the Aero liked to eat: Federal Copper-plated 36-grain hollow point. All rounds fed and fired perfectly, with the best group at .94 of an inch. Not only does the Aero like this round to eat, it also spits them out with great accuracy.

Third in line was the bulk ammo/plinking load: Remington Thunderbolt 40-grain lead round nose. This one was the surprise of the group, as I did not expect the accuracy I got. Later, I ended up shooting some extra groups to see what kind of voodoo Remington is stuffing these little shells with, as my best group was .87 of an inch!

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A nice feature, especially when clearing jams, is the ability to manually lock the bolt back, as seen here in the 10mm configuration.

The Remington functioned very well in the Aero, with the exception of a couple of failed ignitions, similar to the Winchester white box ammo. I feel that the small, round firing pin footprint is part of the issue here, along with a weak hammer strike on the firing pin. The other culprit is mass-produced rimfire rounds, which don’t always have a complete primer circle at the bottom of the brass. ELEY is known for the most precise rimfire primer process in the industry, and that is probably why ignition was no issue when it was chambered in the Aero.

It was time for ELEY again, with its sub-sonic 38-grain hollow point. This ammo was very accurate, with the best group at .88 of an inch, but I experienced many failure-to-feed malfunctions. This is not ELEY’s fault, nor the fault of TNW, as the Aero is designed for high-velocity .22 LR ammunition, and this is a lower-velocity load made for suppressor use. If you want to shoot this load from an Aero, I feel that it can be done with some simple recoil-spring modifications. Bottom line, this rifle in .22 LR can hunt small game with no issues, as far as accuracy is concerned.

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Remington Thunderbolt .22 LR ammo was expected to be a plinker round for testing, but performed well, as seen in this target measuring 1.32 inches. The best group was just .87 of an inch at 100 feet!

All in all, the TNW Aero Survival Rifle can be a great hunting, survival, home-defense, or plinking gun. The concept is very good, and with a few small improvements, the Aero would be a fantastic addition to anyone’s gun collection for any shooting purpose, limited only by the caliber of choice.

TNW Aero Survival Rifle Specs

  • Barrel length: U.S. 16.25″; Canada 18.75″
  • Barrel Twist: 9mm 1:10, .40 S&W 1:16, .45ACP 1:16, 10mm 1:16, .357 SIG 1:10, .22LR 1:16 (6 Land Barrels)
  • Overall length: U.S. 33.0″; Canada 35.5″
  • Overall length (Collapsed Stock): U.S. 29.5″; Canada 32.0″
  • Breakdown dimensions with barrel removed: U.S. 17.25″
  • Available calibers: .22LR, 9mm, 357SIG,.40S&W, .45ACP, 10mm
  • Magazine Configuration: Glock pistol style, any capacity, (Remington 597-type for .22LR)
  • Ejection: Left or right-handed
  • Weight: 5.5 lbs.
  • Coating: Hard Anodized
  • Action: Semi-automatic, direct blow back
  • Safety: Sliding safety and integrated child trigger lock
  • Includes: One Glock-style magazine (One Remington-style for .22LR), Upper and lower rails
  • MSRP: $799
  • .22 LR Conversion Kit MSRP: $370
  • TNW Firearms Inc. P.O. Box 311, Vernonia OR, 97064, Tel: 503-429-5001, Fax: 503-429-3505, sales@tnwfirearms.com, tech@tnwfirearms.com, TNWFirearms.com
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Democrat Party Platform: Ban Online Ammo Sales, License All Gun Owners

A man displays an anti gun violence sign during a March for our Lives Rally at Fairfield Hills Campus, in Newtown Connecticut on August 12, 2018. (Photo by KENA BETANCUR / AFP) (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)

The 2020 Democrat Party platform is rife with gun controls that include an all-out ban on online ammunition sales and a push to require every state in the Union to license gun owners.

The 2020 platform also continues a pledge to secure universal background checks, which have existed in California since the 1990s and are currently in place in New York, New Jersey, and other states rife with gun violence.

Gabby Giffords’s gun control law center reports 13 states in total have such checks.

The Democrat’s platform also pledges a ban on online gun sales and efforts to prohibit “some individuals convicted of assault or battery to buy and possess firearms.” Additionally, Democrats will “ban the manufacture and sale of assault weapons and high capacity magazines” and “pass legislation requiring that guns be safely stored in homes.”

The platform also makes clear Democrats want to open gun makers up to lawsuits by “repealing the law that shields gun manufacturers from civil liability.” This is a reference to the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (2005), which was put in place to protect gun makers from frivolous lawsuits in instances where the guns in question were legally made and legally sold.

Joe Biden has long campaigned on repealing the PLCAA and opening gun makers up to lawsuits.

On February 24, 2020, Breitbart News reported Biden speaking in South Carolina, referencing gun makers and saying, “I’m going to take you down.”

Missouri man accidentally shoots himself at Rocky Mountain National Park

A 70-year-old tourist from Missouri suffered a gunshot wound from a handgun he was carrying in his backpack at one of the most popular hiking areas in Rocky Mountain National Park, park officials say.

According to a park news release concerning the July 19 incident, the man was hiking with the gun in his backpack, and when he set his pack on a rock, the gun discharged. A bullet struck him in the leg and did not exit his body. The incident occurred on a Sunday when many park visitors were in the vicinity. Some assisted him with initial first aid, according to the park’s public information officer, Kyle Patterson.

“The man was carried out via a wheeled litter to the Bear Lake Trailhead, where he was taken by Estes Health Ambulance to a meadow in the Glacier Basin Campground where he was flown by Lifeguard Two Air Ambulance to Medical Center of the Rockies (in Loveland),” according to the release.

Asked why the park was releasing the information nine days after the incident, Patterson said the investigation needed to be completed first.

The news release went on to remind visitors that the open carry of firearms and concealed carry are allowed in the park, pursuant to Colorado concealed carry permits, “and applicable state reciprocity laws.” The release said visitors should not consider firearms as “a wildlife protection strategy,” suggesting bear spray be used instead.

Rocky Mountain National Park said the condition of the injured hiker is currently unknown.

Source: Missouri man accidentally shoots himself at Rocky Mountain National Park

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