Conceal Carry News

This category focuses on conceal carry topics and new. Up-to-date on conceal carry laws, restrictions, debates and etc. Learn about conceal carry before concealing.

New York Sergeant Who Shot Unarmed Man Is Fired Amid Investigation – The New York Times

After the off-duty shooting in Brooklyn, Sgt. Ritchard Blake was caught on video dropping a knife near the man and then picking it up again.

A police sergeant who was under investigation in connection with the off-duty shooting of an unarmed man in the face in Brooklyn was fired on Friday, a police official said.

Moments after the shooting on Aug. 2 in the East New York neighborhood, video surveillance footage captured the sergeant, Ritchard Blake, patting down the man, Thavone Santana, as if looking for a weapon.

The sergeant then pulled a sheath knife out of his back pocket and dropped it out of its covering beside Mr. Santana. After briefly pacing, Sergeant Blake picked it back up, the video shows.

Mr. Santana, 21, survived the shooting.

The surveillance video, which was described by two law enforcement officials and later posted by NBC New York, raised questions about what had happened, and the Brooklyn district attorney’s office said it would conduct “an independent and thorough” review.

Source: New York Sergeant Who Shot Unarmed Man Is Fired Amid Investigation – The New York Times

How to conceal a weapon while driving?-MTR Custom Leather tells all…Holster options for carrying a weapon in a vehicle or sitting. 

Concealment while walking is easier than driving in a vehicle. While it may be challenging to conceal your weapon when driving, there are a few things to consider doing to better assist you with concealing your weapon while driving.

Logically, first thing you think of is housing your weapon in a glove box or some sort of compartment in the vehicle. It’s a better fitment and comfortable for you. It’s the perfect shape and compartment to store a weapon and conceal it and it’s not too hard to access. While storing the weapon in the compartment, it should be retained in some sort of holster. The trigger of the weapon should always be covered while storing or wearing at all times. This is very important for safety reason. That’s a whole other topic. If you do decided to carry in a compartment or door compartment, please always use caution and practice drawing your weapon unloaded to work on your speed and accuracy in case of emergency. Attention and awareness should be taken to avoid excessive vibration, bouncing or movement while the vehicle is in motion or worst case scenario an accident.

On the other hand, there are many positions to carry a weapon on your body for concealment when standing, but while riding/driving may be a weird position or uncomfortable or even a struggle due to the seat belt. Wearing a holster in the appendix iwb may work for some depending on the size of the weapon and the person’s built, but for others it may not. So one may want to consider a crossdraw hip holster on the OWB like MTR’s A-8 Paddle holster. MTR’s paddle holster can be worn in several different positions due to the paddle on the back of the holster can be moved to adjust the ride height and the cant of the holster by easily using a screw driver. Being that it is a paddle holster, one can take on and off the holster fairly easily due to it clips inside of the pants while the holster sits on the OWB. A forward cant on a holster, can make it easier to sit and drive in a vehicle. Some may call this position an FBI cant or others call it a crossdraw.  MTR dose offer an A-1C Crossdraw holster that slides onto a belt and is about a 10-15 degree cant forward. This type of cant clears the direction of the seat belt and puts no pressure on the hip or gut while driving/sitting.

 A-3A Tuckable Adversay with Ulticlip3 Crossdraw IWB 

 A-8 Paddle

When driving a vehicle and trying to conceal the weapon, there are a few things to consider, one is the position of your body. Your posture can affect the comfort of a holster and concealment as well. Sitting straight up can cause pressure off the weapon and holster. Also, can cause less printing of the weapon through the shirt. A tip: some may recline the seat just a tab for better comfort and posture of the weapon on you. Secondly, keep in mind safety precautions. For instance, if you get stopped by police, one should communicate with the officer that the weapon is currently being stored in the compartment, whether it’s in a glove box, under the seat, door compartment or elsewhere BEFORE reaching for it. Upon communicating to the officer about your weapon, keep your hands in plain sight. Ask the officer how they wish to proceed about the weapon. Keep in mind that each state and country may have different laws and regulations concerning storage and concealment of weapons, whether it’s on you or being stored in a vehicle. So please do your thoroughly research before concealing your weapon.

 

Other Options:

 Consider a bag or purse, using MTR A-3A Tuckable Adversary with Ulticlip3 

 

Consider out Ukoalabags.. great for riding on bikes or motorcycles

 pocket holsters MTR B-7 Front Pocket Holster  or B-6 Back Pocket (cargo pocket, jacket pocket, etc)

 

 

 

 

 

Source: MTR Custom Leather,LLC

Pocket Power Perfected 

The

The Springfield XD-S Mod.2 Subcompact is a polymer-framed .45 ACP carry gun thinner than a 9mm GLOCK 43, weighing two oz. less than a .380 ACP Walther PPK/S. The XD-S Mod.2 Subcompact packs 6+1 .45 ACP flying ashtrays into the grip yet carries almost as well as your smartphone. Amazingly, despite its diminutive geometry, the .45 ACP XD-S still isn’t butt whooping on the range. This surprised me.

What’s the most fun handgun you’ve ever run? I’m not talking about the Desert Eagle, making you think you look like Arnold Schwarzenegger circa 1984 and weighing as much as your microwave. It’s cool, not fun. You don’t want to hump it. You don’t really much want to shoot it. You just want to slip into a leather jacket and wield it before a full-length mirror in the privacy of your own bedroom. Don’t hate. We’ve all been there. However, for pure unfiltered shooting pleasure I’d have to say my favorite handgun is a Walther P22 with a sound suppressor.

The P22 weighs about nothing, flirts with being recoilless, and, with the can attached, will not offend your eardrums unduly. The P22 throws its tidy little 40-gr. lead bullets ably and well. However, I once met a poor unfortunate sot in an urban ER who had absorbed a full dozen of these zippy little rounds and yet remained a fairly engaging conversationalist. The gun I carry to defend myself and my family is not meant to be fun. It’s meant to be lethal. In the Springfield XD-S Mod.2 Subcompact, however, we actually get a little bit of both.

Source: Pocket Power Perfected | American Handgunner

Shooting Illustrated | Concealed-Carry Basics: Tips From a Professional

New to concealed carry? Here are some tips from a professional to help get you started in the right direction.

Those new to concealed carry can find themselves overwhelmed. The industry has exploded over the past few decades, and rightfully so, as folks take ownership of their own safety. It is a personal responsibility, but it is also a learned skill. The first challenge for those new to concealed carry is understanding a three-tiered approach toward carrying concealed. Breaking the three tiers down into the base, lower- and upper-body garments gives structure to a rather nebulous subject.

When I first started carrying concealed, I didn’t know what I was doing. I had received countless hours of firearm- and tactics-related training, but nothing in the sense of how to carry concealed. I was not only on my own, but I was thrown into the deep end of a shark-infested pool wearing a meat suit to perform my duties. I wasn’t afforded the opportunity to make mistakes—I had to get it right the first time and every time thereafter. It forced me to think carefully about not only what I was carrying, but also how I dressed.

I am excited to see so many people take a more-vested interest in their personal safety. I honestly don’t question their reasons. My job is to prepare them for what will be the worst day of their lives in the best way possible. I have taken an active interest in understanding their “why,” as it helps me do my job of better educating them. I also have to understand the various barriers to entry that may keep them from learning.

(l.) Ruger Security-9 (r.) Glock G19

The two most common are fear of the unknown and fear of not knowing. While these two items may seem similar, they are vastly different. Fear of the unknown is simple—it is not knowing what to expect. Not knowing what to expect puts people in a defensive posture at times, standoffish and not open to change. The best piece of advice I can share is you are not alone. Everyone has been there and what I love about this community is how eager folks are to help. The fear of not knowing is more challenging. This is being afraid to look the fool, to not know what you are doing. Again, you are human and this is normal. My best piece of advice is to keep your eye on the prize. If you are doing this for a reason, stay focused on that reason. Everyone has to start somewhere; remember that.

I spend a lot of time answering questions. A common question I get is what firearm is best for the person in question to carry. We are blessed with many options, but that, too, is a curse. What I do is give you criteria, not what I carry. I give you the “why” so you can best source the firearm that fits your needs. Assuming reliability standards are met, the three most-important aspects are capacity, compactness and logistics. It is ideal if you can avoid a reload in a gunfight, so having enough ammunition is what I’m talking about. I don’t much care what caliber you select—the caliber wars are over. What matters to me is how many rounds I can carry. For this reason, the 9 mm is king. You get optimal terminal performance combined with capacity, specifically a minimum of 10 rounds.

(l.) Springfield Armory XD Mod.2 Sub-Compact (r.) Smith & Wesson M&P9 M2.0 Compact

When you think concealment, you naturally think small or compact. There is a point of diminishing returns where too small is a poor choice. You have to find a good compromise to fit your needs. The micro-compact pistols are great, but they are not easy to shoot well. Two things to consider are reliability and accuracy. The smaller guns have smaller parts, that shouldn’t come as a surprise, but it can be challenging to foster robust operation as parts shrink. Accordingly, smaller parts can have shorter shelf lives and direct effects on the accuracy component. The micro-compact pistols can be difficult to shoot, not always fitting into our hands well or having more-pronounced recoil. In order to combat these issues, you will need to practice, which means more wear and tear on those smaller parts. While I love these micro-compacts and my belief is a small gun is better than no gun, I view these more as “gateway guns.”

As the newcomer practices, they become more aware, and their equipment choices evolve along the way. The last element to consider is logistics. There is an old saying, “amateurs argue tactics while professionals argue logistics.” The supporting-equipment industry for concealed carry is like any other industry and it is driven by profit. Manufacturers are not going to make custom items for less-popular firearms without significant investment, instead focusing their efforts on top sellers. They had to devote resources toward product development, materials, tooling, marketing and a host of other costs to ensure a return on their investment. The more-popular models will afford more available options and increase the chances of finding something fitting your needs.

SIG Sauer P365

Once you have settled on a primary-carry pistol, your next task is finding a safe holster. While some micro-compact pistols can fit in a pocket, I strongly suggest you always use a holster. The holster will accomplish several things. Starting with the administrative stuff, it will shield the firearm from unwanted foreign objects and debris—stuff like lint, loose items, body oils and perspiration to name a few. While it doesn’t seem like much, they can foul up the operation of your firearm, or worse, apply pressure to your unprotected trigger leading to a negligent discharge. (Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com)

A holster will be many things, but these are the features it must have in order to be considered a good one. It must first retain the firearm. When properly inserted, the firearm should be secure, to the point where if you were to carefully turn it upside down (over something soft like a pillow) the firearm stays secure in the holster. Next, it must protect the trigger from unauthorized access. This can come in the form of many things, some of which were mentioned earlier. Loose clothing, the holster itself and other items (even your own fingers) should not be allowed access to the trigger while the gun is holstered. It must fit securely to the body. You obviously don’t want to lose the firearm/holster, but you also don’t want to draw and find your holster came along for the ride. Believe me, it happens more than you think. Lastly, you want to obtain a firing grip while still holstered. If parts of the holster or positioning make it difficult to properly grasp with a firm, firing grip, find something else. Under high stress if you start off with a poor grip it is not going to improve itself on the way to the target. Once you’ve selected a good holster, next is a good belt. You may even find you need multiple holsters for the same gun to cover different situations. (Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com)

Remember to balance comfort with carry. For many new to concealed carry, it is awkward—and in some cases, uncomfortable. If you are not comfortable you will constantly be adjusting, tweaking or fidgeting. Either case, you are drawing attention to yourself, and the first rule of concealed carry is avoid doing just that. There are advantages and disadvantages to the various methods of carry; whether outside or inside the waistband. Inside will greatly reduce your profile, but some find it uncomfortable. Outside seems more comfortable to many, but not as concealed. Whatever your choice, you will need a rigid or sturdy belt to hold the weight of your gear. Like everything else we have discussed, there are features to look for and belts are no different. The most-important feature to consider is stiffness. Stiffer construction will mean avoiding belt sag. The outboard drooping will force the inside surface of the holster to contact your hip region. At first, it seems minor, but the longer you carry, the more pressure it applies to that point. It will get more uncomfortable and intensify pretty fast.

While no one holster can cover all situations, look for sturdy construction from a recognized manufacturer. Whether Kydex or leather, inside- the-waistband or appendix-carry style, having gear that fully covers your trigger and rides comfortably on your belt will go a long way toward ensuring your pistol is always with you. (Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com)

You have limited options for belt material, usually leather or nylon. While many love a good-looking leather belt, you have to be OK with it getting scuffed up—because it will. Nylon is versatile, but to get the stiffness there needs to be more than a single layer. Here’s where stitching comes into play, not only joining two (or more) pieces, but adding rigidity. Three- and five-row stitching are the most common, but other options include internal stiffeners. The buckle is the final piece to this puzzle. Your buckle should be low key, secure and adjustable if possible. If you change holster positions or live in a seasonal climate, having an adjustable belt will make life easier. Buckles come in all different sizes and shapes, keep it low key and follow your personal preference as long as it secures the belt.

Having a stout, reinforced belt can make a world of difference when carrying a concealed handgun. Whether double-stitched leather or internally reinforced nylon, the belt should be sturdy enough to fully distribute your holstered pistol’s weight evenly, without twisting or bending. (Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com)


While there are many subtleties in selecting your equipment, this is a great place to start. You will notice we introduced the top and bottom layers, but didn’t go into detail. It may seem overwhelming, but don’t be discouraged. Take each of the base layers one at time. Research and even try out your firearm. Select a good holster for comfort and conceal it well. Invest in a solid belt to keep it all secure. I will give you one final piece of advice. Don’t be married to your gear. Technology, designs and material are in a constant of flux. New products are being introduced frequently. Now, you have a method to measure how well they will work for you. Over the years, I have gone through countless holsters. My experience has led me to these simple considerations; which should help guide you on your new journey. Good luck.


About the author:
Jeff Gonzales serves as president of Trident Concepts and director of training for The Range at Austin. He served as a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL, having participated in numerous combat operations throughout the world. His duties involved a wide variety of operational and instructional assignments on both coasts. Through Trident Concepts, Gonzales pioneered new advances in firearms and tactics instruction. His unique understanding of adult learning, detailed curriculum development and rigorous adherence to performance standards continue to set him apart from a crowded field.

Recently, Gonzales has increased his focus on concealed carry. Leveraging his experience operating in non-permissive environments all over the world, he has unique knowledge to share with members of law enforcement, the military and responsible armed citizens. (Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com) (Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com)

Source: Shooting Illustrated | Concealed-Carry Basics: Tips From a Professional

California teachers put new pressure on gun sellers – CBS News

Their $222 billion pension fund threatens to sell its shares in any that resist its push to limit sales

WEST SACRAMENTO, Calif. – One of the largest public pension funds in the nation voted Wednesday to use its financial might to pressure gun retailers across the country to stop selling military-style assault weapons and accessories like rapid-fire “bump stocks” used at the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting.

The $222.5 billion California State Teachers’ Retirement System said it will try to unseat board members at companies that resist and could dump their stock if they still refuse to conform to laws already in effect in California.

The fund plans an accompanying publicity drive to leverage the student-led nationwide push following the February massacre at a Florida high school. Fund officials also are lobbying other pension funds and investors to join their campaign. The system funds pensions for more than 900,000 public school educators and their families.

Aside from outlawing bump stocks and restricting assault-style weapons, California bans sales of magazines holding more than 10 bullets and assault rifles that can rapidly be reloaded.

Opponents said the board is setting a dangerous precedent.

If Congress and other states won’t act to prevent schools “from becoming killing fields, then let’s take the battle to where the money is,” said state Treasurer John Chiang, a Democrat who led the push and is running for governor in next month’s primary election.

The board acted as Democratic state lawmakers introduced legislation that would require the nation’s largest public pension system to similarly pressure retailers to stop selling military-style weapons and attachments. The $350 billion California Public Employees’ Retirement System declined to do so in March.

Both the teachers and public employee funds had already divested from assault weapon manufacturers after the 2012 slayings at a Connecticut elementary school.

San Diego area teacher Jessica Moore told board members Wednesday that her job now includes plotting exit routes and comforting children during lockdowns. “I think in terms of taking a bullet for them,” she said tearfully.

Retired teacher and San Diego gun control advocate Carol Landale urged the board to “hit the gun industry in the pocketbook.”

“I do not want my dollars invested in an industry that sells weapons that kill children,” Landale said.

Gun Owners of California Executive Director Sam Paredes in an email called Chiang’s support “a desperate move by a desperate politician trying anything to gain attention.”

Firearms Policy Coalition spokesman Craig DeLuz said: “Lawmakers are moving beyond unconstitutionally regulating guns and toward using the force of government to bully and coerce the market. This isn’t a slippery slope. It’s a cliff that hostile government actors are forcing people and businesses to walk off.”

The teachers’ fund invests about $465 million in 10 retailers, but the bulk — $344 million — is in Walmart (WMT), which did not respond to a request for comment.

Walmart is among retailers that already stopped selling assault weapons and bump stocks, and Chiang could not say what more he wants the company to do. Sen. Anthony Portantino of La Canada Flintridge, who is carrying the related legislation, said recent changes by Walmart and other retailers show the power of public pressure.

Board member Paul Rosenstiel said the fund’s investment represents less than 1 percent of Walmart’s stock and questioned devoting $280,000 for two staff members to coordinate the fund’s lobbying effort. But he went along when the fund’s chief investment officer, Christopher Ailman, said he’s working to recruit other funds to join the effort.

“We are going to do our part,” said the fund’s investment committee chairman, Harry Keiley. “Sadly, it will not end the horrific violence in America’s public schools but … we did what we could.”

Source: California teachers put new pressure on gun sellers – CBS News

2018 USCCA Concealed Carry Expo | APRIL 13th – APRIL 15th | Louisville, KY

The Concealed Carry Expo is a consumer show dedicated to opening a world of tactical ingenuity to responsible gun owners. This Expo offers safe and practical seminars from industry experts, a live-fire shooting range to test new handguns, and a huge selection of gear, services, and information from our trusted industry partners.

COME OUT AND SEE MTR CUSTOM LEATHER, LLC BOOTH NUMBER 336.

Source: 2018 USCCA Concealed Carry Expo | APRIL 13th – APRIL 15th | Louisville, KY

Current Laser Sight Promotions | Official Crimson Trace

From March 1, 2018 through April 30, 2018 – purchase a Crimson Trace® laser sight* and receive a FREE CMR-201 Rail Master® Universal Red Laser Sight. The CMR-201 is a powerful red laser sighting solution for rail-equipped pistols, rifles or shotguns and is one of our most popular models. Whether you choose to buy through our website, a Local Authorized Dealer (MTR Custom Leather, LLC), or one of our Featured Online Retailers – this is the time to outfit your firearms with the ultimate sighting solution. See below for additional information.

Current Crimson Trace company and product promotions.

Source: Current Laser Sight Promotions | Official Crimson Trace

Sig Sauer P365 – We now have holsters Available 

We now have ALL of our holsters available for the NEW Sig Sauer P365 weapon. Order yours today!

 

(336)879-2166

Introducing the game changing Sig Sauer P365. Micro-compact everyday carry size with unprecedented 10+1 full-size capacity. The P365 is striker-fired, with the clean crisp trigger pull you expect from a SIG. Lightweight and easy to conceal, the P365 is chambered in 9mm and is rated for +P ammunition. Included standard are XRAY3 Day/Night sights, a 10-round flush fit magazine, and a 10-round extended magazine. An optional 12-round extended magazine allows you to bring the total capacity to 13 rounds. The new P365. Bring More. Everyday.

The unique grip design and higher grip to bore axis reduces perceived recoil and makes the P365 as comfortable to shoot as many mid-sized pistols. The grip is fully-textured polymer with a slim-line rail that will accommodate SIG light or laser accessories. The stainless-steel slide comes standard with front and rear serrations for easier slide manipulation, as well as XRAY3 Day/Night sights for faster sight acquisition under all lighting conditions.

Disassembly is safe and easy with a three-point takedown that does not require the trigger to be pulled. A generous trigger guard undercut also allows for a higher hand position and better retention. The narrowing magazine design allows the upper part of the grip to be perfectly contoured to fit the shooter’s thumb when fired.

The P365 is a pistol for professionals and civilians alike who want a smaller, high-performance pistol that does it all. This is the ultimate, everyday concealed carry pistol.

 

www.mtrcustomleather.com Source: Sig sauer P365 – Google Search

165 House Dems introduce ban on most semi-auto firearms

Democrats in the U.S. House on Monday kicked off a renewed effort to prohibit a number of popular gun designs from civilian ownership.

Proposed by U.S. Rep. David N. Cicilline, D-RI, and joined by 164 co-sponsors from his party, H.R.5087, would not only recycle the expired federal ban on “assault weapons” but greatly expand its scope. The lawmaker argues it is needed to end the “carnage” on America’s streets.

“Assault weapons were made for one purpose,” Cicilline said. “They are designed to kill as many people as possible in a short amount of time. They do not belong in our communities.”

The bill, one of the most ambitious bans proposed in recent years, would bar the importation, production, or transfer of 205 firearms by name to include a myriad of semi-auto AR-15 and AK-47 variants. Going past that, any semi-auto rifle with a detachable magazine and any “military-style feature” such as a barrel shroud, pistol grip or threaded barrel, would be caught in the net.

Additionally, a semi-auto shotgun with any feature or the capability to hold more than five shells would be forbidden. Rifles, other than .22s, with an internal magazine capable of holding more than 10-rounds, would be banned. Pistols affected would include any with a threaded barrel or a magazine well located in any spot except the grip. All belt-fed semi-automatic firearms, typically expensive niche guns popular with collectors but rarely used in crime, would be outlawed.

The bill also includes language to ban bump stocks, and detachable magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. It would authorize federal funding through Byrne grants for “buy back” programs to purchase unwanted newly classified assault weapons and magazines from the public. Those with grandfathered items would be licensed under the act, with fees set by the Justice Department, and could only transfer them to another individual with a license or to a gun dealer. Grandfathered magazines would have to be dated prior to the act becoming effective.

The National Rifle Association said lawmakers pushing new firearm regulations in the wake of a school shooting in Florida are “attempting to capitalize on this tragedy to convince members of Congress to vote for their gun control wish list.”

The bill has been referred to the Republican-controlled House Committee on the Judiciary. The GOP holds a commanding 238-193 majority in the chamber and Speaker Paul Ryan, who would have to allow a floor vote on the measure if it escaped committee, has repeatedly said that bans have not proven to be successful in the past.

Democrats in the U.S. House on Monday kicked off a renewed effort to prohibit a number of popular gun designs from civilian ownership.

Source: 165 House Dems introduce ban on most semi-auto firearms

Is This the Moment for Gun Control? A Gridlocked Congress Is Under Pressure – The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers will return to Washington on Monday facing intense public pressure to break their decades-long gridlock on gun control, a demand fortified by a bipartisan group of governors calling for Congress to take action to protect against mass shootings.

But even as members of both parties said it might be difficult for Congress to remain on the sidelines after the school massacre this month in Parkland, Fla., lawmakers have no clear consensus on even incremental changes to gun restrictions, let alone more sweeping legislation.

Over a weeklong recess, Republican leaders in both the House and the Senate remained largely silent on gun legislation, a reflection of the significant obstacles to passing even modest measures this year.

Many Republicans fear primary challenges from the right in the midterm elections this fall and do not want to be pushed into difficult votes. Democrats are not eager for legislation that they deem too incremental. And with lawmakers of both parties looking to wrap up their work to focus on their campaigns for re-election, the time to pass any significant legislation is running short.

If the past is prologue, Congress will do nothing.

But governors who gathered in Washington for their annual winter meeting warned of the perils of inaction. Animated by a wave of polling since the Florida massacre, Democratic governors warned that candidates would pay a political price for opposing new gun regulations, and some of their Republican counterparts conceded that the pleas of voters could no longer be ignored as they increasingly abandon the party.

“I think for Republicans our challenge in the next race is going to be about appealing to the suburban vote that hasn’t been so good for Republicans the last few races,” said Gov. Bill Haslam of Tennessee, citing in particular suburban women. It is clear, he added, that “people want to see action.”

The combination of political pressure from the governors and moves by President Trump to embrace certain limited measures opposed by the National Rifle Association could set up a congressional showdown with the powerful firearms lobby not seen since the gun debate that followed the deadly school shooting in 2012 in Newtown, Conn.

The sudden focus on guns is likely to complicate an already busy agenda. Congress left Washington without coming up with a replacement for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which protects hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation and expires next week. A contentious debate over gun legislation could push immigration to the back burner.

While the Newtown massacre and the many that have followed have produced familiar scenes in which Democrats push for tough new gun restrictions and Republicans dig in and resist, the latest mass shooting appears to have shifted the landscape, even if just slightly, as the Parkland students have become overnight gun control advocates and media fixtures.

A smattering of congressional Republicans — including some who have been staunchly opposed to gun control legislation — now suggest that they would be willing to take at least small steps toward restricting gun rights.

After being jeered at a forum televised on CNN, Senator Marco Rubio, Republican of Florida, said last week that he would reconsider his opposition to limiting high-capacity magazines. Another Florida Republican, Representative Brian Mast, an Army veteran who lost both of his legs to a roadside bomb in Afghanistan, called for a ban on the purchase of assault weapons.

Gun control advocates are looking toward the changing political climate in Florida, where the Republican governor, Rick Scott, and state lawmakers defied the N.R.A. in proposing to raise to 21 the minimum age to buy any firearm.

Senator Jeff Flake, Republican of Arizona, is teaming up with Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, on legislation that would raise to 21 from 18 the age threshold for purchasing assault weapons like the AR-15 used to kill 17 people in Parkland.

poll released by CNN on Sunday, which showed support for stricter gun laws at levels not seen since the early 1990s, found that 71 percent of Americans backed barring those under 21 from buying any type of firearm.

“I don’t know if crossing the Rubicon is the right historical analogy, but there is a sense that this is different,” Mr. Flake said, adding, “Where the public is and where some Republicans have been on some of these issues just doesn’t match, and I do think we’re going to have to deal with it.”

Senator Pat Roberts, Republican of Kansas, a longtime ally of the N.R.A., has said he would back such an age-restriction proposal. “Certainly nobody under 21 should have an AR-15,” he told reporters in Kansas last week.

Mr. Flake, however, is not seeking re-election, and Mr. Roberts, 81, is unlikely to run again in 2020.

At the governors’ meeting, there was agreement on the issue between Democrats and some Republicans. “We do it for alcohol; we’re talking about raising the age for tobacco to 21,” said Gov. Gary R. Herbert of Utah, a Republican. “I think that’s worth talking about.”

Lawmakers have no clear consensus on even incremental changes to gun restrictions, let alone more sweeping legislation.

Source: Is This the Moment for Gun Control? A Gridlocked Congress Is Under Pressure – The New York Times

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