Laser/Lights Attachments

This category keeps you up to date with the newest and hottest lasers and lights attachments for weapons.

A Guide to Leather – MTR Custom Leather Blog-Discussing Calf Skin Leather Hides??

A Guide to Leather - MTR Custom Leather Blog-Discussing Calf Skin Leather Hides??There are many different types of leathers that are used on footwear these days. And many different styles to the same type of  so allow me to break down the most common options and tell you a bit about each, sharing what their plus and minuses, myths and all of the other opinions I might have on each.

Calfskin – Saying calfskin is like saying the word ‘car.’ It’s the general type of leather used to produce many of the sub types, like ‘crust’ or ‘box’ (aka , aka box ‘calfskin’ — see what I am saying?). It simply means that the leather came from calf, as opposed to a full grown cow (which in reality is the case most of the leather used in the high end shoe industry). Cow leather is simply not that great. Think about your 18 year old skin versus your 60 year old skin (no offense, but it’s a reality). That’s the difference between calfskin and cowskin.

The most common type of calfskins found in dress shoes are the following:

  1.  (below) –  is untreated (read as not dyed) leather. It is left intentionally natural in color in order to allow for a coloring process after the fact (i.e. not in the tannery, but rather by the shoe factory, a patina artist or some other 3rd party). A lot of what is on offer these days is crust calf and that is because a lot of people want a patina/aged/burnished look and doing this on Crust calf is best and easiest. Italians and the French have been the ones to really pioneer the use of Crust calf with their history of colorful shoes. Crust calf, not having been in the drum for dyeing, is usually softer than the other types of Calfskins. However, in some cases, this softness can result to heavier creasing so do beware of that. Everything comes with a trade-off. Also, because it is left untreated, it means that the leathers’ defects (scars/scratches/bites etc) are usually more prominent as they are not hidden by the dyeing process of the drums and finishing of the tanneries.
A Guide to Leather
Crust Calf
A Guide to Leather
Box calf
  • Box Calf (aniline – above) – Box calf is the most traditional and commonly used leather there is. It is simply a pre-dyed leather, like 99% of all black calf leather. Most likely any shoe that has a uniform finish is going to be made from Box calf. The English shoemakers have traditionally stuck with Box calf as they never got so much into patina and making Green/Blue/Red shoes (although this is changing 😊. Some notable tanneries producing Box calf are Weinheimer for Black calf, Du Puy and Annonay for everything else.

    Box calf will always be stiffer due to the dyeing process. And Black box calf will traditionally be the most rigid. Something about the black dye makes it harder than the rest. For creasing, well this will depend on the quality of the skin as I have seen Box calf hardly crease at all and then some that creased worse than anything else. In this department, there is no true rhyme or reason. But it is also generally thought of as being more resistant and durable with respects to its crust counterpart.

  •  (image below) – This is somewhat of a contradiction in itself but it’s common in the industry so let’s discuss it. Bookbinder/Polished/Shined calf is simply a way to take cheap leather and give it a top acrylic coating that hides all blemishes and leaves this plastic like look. It allows the shoemaker to buy cheap and sell high, tricking customers into believing that it is top quality calfskin when it is not. Italian brands have been doing this for years. Nearly all designer brands use this type of leather, quite frequently as it is a GREAT way to increase your profit margins. The lower priced welted English brands have been using this too for quite some time although I presume that their ideas for doing so might be more functional for the following reasons.

    Bookbinder is durable. Its top coating makes it nearly impenetrable. So if you live in a wet environment, then bookbinder leather can be a good option for you in order to not have your shoes so easily ruined or requiring constant upkeep. The downside is that it is extremely rigid which means it cracks easily, particularly in the vamp where the shoe creases during each step. And once it cracks, that’s it. There is no coming back from that. And it also scuffs easily and you can’t shine those scuffs out as it is in the acrylic, not the leather.

A Guide to Leather
Bookbinder – Image courtesy of Fratelli Rossetti

 –  is leather. Don’t be mistaken. It’s the underside of the hide i.e. the part that is inside the calf. For it’s long hair like textured appearance it has been loved and hated by many for years for various reasons. Let’s discuss the different types of  and the pro’s and con’s of each.

  1.  –  is simply the premium uncut suede that you typically find in the very high end, expensive shoes. You can tell that suede is full grain when it is super soft and when you rub your fingers over it, it drastically changes from light to dark depending on which way the hair is laying. The hairs of the suede will always be quite long on a . It will also have a shimmery sheen to it. It’s hard to explain but is more vibrant than the other suedes.
  2.  – Split suede is like bookbinder in a manner of speaking. They shave off the top layer of the suede, most likely as a way to hide less-premium cuts that have more noticeable blemishes were they to leave the suede uncut. Split suede is cheaper and more often than not seen as inferior. Its texture is not nearly as plush as full-grain suede and does not have as much of a contrast between light and dark when rubbing your fingers across the suede. Its hairs are naturally shorter.
A Guide to Leather
Split grain suede by J.FitzPatrick Footwear

Here are a few of my opinions on the matter of suede and the differences between full grain and split suede. Split suede is often bad mouthed but in reality most makers are using it and let me explain why. First of all, Full Grain is insanely expensive, nearly double (if not more) the cost of split suede. Of course it is nicer to feel but it is not better in terms of durability and I believe that is why it is not used as much. You don’t get double the lifespan from it and it is often more expensive than premium calfskins. It doesn’t age as well either as when those beautiful long hairs of the suede start to get worn down from wear and tear it simply does not look as nice anymore. It shows more so it’s wear and tear. Split suede on the other hand is not nearly as plush and elegant looking but it is durable and holds up well to wear and tear.

I once wore my snuff suede chukka boots (split suede) on a scooter in Paris and got caught in a hailstorm downpour. I got so wet that the shoes turned black. But when they dried, they dried just fine, evenly and the snuff went back to its original color. And that’s the beauty of split suede. When it comes from a good tannery, then its quality is still high and it wears very well. And on top of that, to be honest, it takes rain better and this myth that suede isn’t good for rain is simply garbage. Cheap suede is not good for rain. Sand suede is not good for rain. But Snuff suede and darker takes bad weather like a charm and in fact, I prefer to wear my suede on wet days than my leather. The only thing one must do is remember to steam and brush your suede once it has dried. Do that and you will forever have good suede.

A Guide to Leather
Grained Brogues by Crockett & Jones

Grain Leather – Grain leather is simply a stamped calfskin. Its look is not natural and is created by the tannery. You buy leather in different thicknesses when buying from the tannery and I want to say that Grain leather is typically a touch thicker than your traditional calfskins as it needs to be when having that texture finish to it. You tend to find grain leathers on models that are more for adverse weather as its textured finish usually hides wear and tear better than a smooth surface does. Some of the more notable grain leather is the dress shoe industry are:

  1. Pebble Grain (shown above) – This is quite the prominent grain and is often used on boots and/or shoe models like full brogues. This is the grain that really takes the weather well as its thick pebble-like finish allows for the ultimate beat up without showing too much wear and tear. The English shoemakers are quite fond of using this type of grain to combat that rainy environment and particularly for those that live in the countryside, want to dress smart and maintain a good pair of shoes. A country brogue or boot is nearly always grained.
  2. Pin Grain – Somewhat like the pebble grain in look, the pin grain is simply a much smaller design of grain, that looks like it could have been made by pin dots. For some reason, its finish is often shinier and I never knew why whereas pebble is always matte. You tend to find pin grain in the higher end shoemakers as it is more fine grain and truth be told, not so sure as to how it holds up to the adverse weather as I have never had a pair. But it’s nice for having something different than calfskin and still being able to maintain elegance through its subtle appearance.
  3. Hatch Grain (shown below) – This grain has taken the industry by storm in the last 10 years. It’s a softer grain all around and much more subtle than it’s pebble-like counterparts. Due to this softer nature, I personally find it more dressy or at least the ability to wear it with more dress attire whereas, for me, I see pebble grain as casual and hence why you often find that on boots or full brogues. But good old Hatch grain is found on all models, even smart oxfords or dressy loafers. It’s the new age grain that many customers seek but that is still somewhat rare to find as it has not fully caught on to being always on offer by all of the tanneries. The only downside is that I don’t believe this grain takes as much wear and tear as the others do.
A Guide to Leather
Shoes by Lof & Tung of Skoaktiebolaget

There are many more variants of leather used in the industry, like Cordovan and a million other types of grain, but the ones in this post make up the majority of what is found on the dress shoes of today.

Knowing the differences will help you make informed decisions about your purchases.

I hope that you have all enjoyed this post. Please share to spread the knowledge!

Justin FitzPatrickA Guide to Leather - MTR Custom Leather Blog-Discussing Calf Skin Leather Hides??

 

 

 

 

 

Source: A Guide to Leather – The Shoe Snob BlogThe Shoe Snob Blog

Rail Master® Pistol Light | CMR-209 | Crimson Trace-NEW LASER-MTR CUSTOM LEATHER HAS HOLSTERS FOR IT 

Rail Master® Pistol Light | CMR-209 | Crimson Trace-NEW LASER-MTR CUSTOM LEATHER HAS HOLSTERS FOR IT 

Introducing the CMR-209 Rail Master® Universal Pistol Light for rail-equipped firearms, a versatile tactical lighting option at an incredible value – from the brand you trust for personal protection optics.Instant Activation™: Tap-On / Tap-Off200 Peak Lumens LED White LightMaterial: PolymerWater Resistant (IPX4)Impact resistance up to 1 meterModes: On/Off • MomentaryBattery life: 1 hr 30 minWeight: 1.98 oz with battery installedFits most pistols with M1913 Picatinny (or similar) accessory rail measuring at least 1″ from recoil lug to trigger guard.

Source: Rail Master® Pistol Light | CMR-209 | Crimson Trace

Laser Sight for Sig Sauer P365 | LG-422 | Crimson Trace- MTR Custom Leather has holsters 

Laser Sight for Sig Sauer P365 | LG-422 | Crimson Trace- MTR Custom Leather has holsters The Crimson Trace® LG-422 Laserguard® is a powerful red laser sight for the SIG SAUER® P365 pistol. The LG-422 is quickly and easily user-installed in moments and offers a front activation button powered by Crimson Trace’s Instinctive Activation™ technology. The laser sight will provide four (4) hours of battery life with a single 1/3N Lithium battery (included). As with all Crimson Trace laser sights, the LG-422 is completely user-adjustable for windage and elevation.

Source: Laser Sight for Sig Sauer P365 | LG-422 | Crimson Trace

What is an MOS

 

The Glock Modular Optic System (MOS)

The Glock MOS models come from the factory with a slot milled out of the top of the slide just forward of the rear sight dovetail. The slot is just about two inches long and maybe 3/16 inches deep if you remove the cover or mounting plate. The gun comes with a “cover” plate installed which fills this gap completely, so at a glance, the Glock 17 MOS Pistol looks like a regular Glock 17 Gen 4 model handgun, except for the visible seams.
Even the slide serrations extend to the cover, so the feel will be the same as a standard Glock when the cover is installed.

Even the slide serrations extend to the cover of the Glock 17 MOS Pistol, so the feel will be the same as a standard Glock when the cover is installed.
To mount an optic directly to the slide, you simply remove the cover plate and replace it with one of four included adapter plates. These plates are clearly numbered one to four and are cut with posts and holes specific to a variety of optics mounting systems.
Compatible optics (at this time) include:
Plate 1: Doctor
Plate 2: Trijicon
Plate 3: C-More
Plate 4: Leupold

Mounting an Optic
The process of mounting an optic is pretty straightforward. Unlike some other optics ready pistols, there are two levels of fastening stuff together with screws.
First, remove the cover plate over the mounting area using the provided Torx wrench. You’ll notice that the optics adapter plate kit comes with four different plates as mentioned above. It also includes four shorter screws than those that attach the cover plate. You only need two screws, so I presume that two are simply spares. They’re shorter because the mounting plate is only about half as tall as the cover plate. This makes sense because, when installed, the base of the optic will be lower than the top of the slide.

Even the slide serrations extend to the cover of the Glock 17 MOS Pistol, so the feel will be the same as a standard Glock when the cover is installed.

Exclusive: Streamlight TLR-8 Weapon Light Series | MTR Custom Leather, LLC

Exclusive: Streamlight TLR-8 Weapon Light Series | MTR Custom Leather, LLCExclusive: Streamlight TLR-8 Weapon Light Series | MTR Custom Leather, LLCExclusive: Streamlight TLR-8 Weapon Light Series | MTR Custom Leather, LLC

When I was a “rookie” police officer in 1985, Streamlight had a reputation for providing strong, durable and most importantly “bright” flashlights that were also “rechargeable.” Considered magical by cops working the nightshift, being made of metal didn’t hurt their reputation either … a far cry from our department-issued two D-cell plastic flashlights with incandescent bulbs. We gladly shelled out our own money to have such a superior flashlight.Today, Streamlight is still setting the trend with a large array of tactical lights and lasers allowing professionals and civilians to optimize the effectiveness of their firearms while investigating suspicious activities in low-light scenarios.The TLR-8 Weapon Light/Laser SeriesThis year, Streamlight introduced the TLR-8 Weapon Light/Laser Series, a high performance, low profile sighting device to the TLR series of rail-mounted tactical light systems. The TLR-8 also features an integrated red aiming laser.The new system is among the smallest rail-mounted lights in the TLR line, delivering 500 lumens to any low/no light situation. Mounting onto a variety of compact and full-sized pistols, the TLR-8 provides safety and versatility with enhanced target identification and aim in low-light environments.The TLR-8 has two modes of operation, a steady light providing constant illumination and a disorienting strobe feature for suspicious targets. The TLR-8’s red laser provides accurate point of aim in low/no light conditions after proper sight-in.

Technical Tidbits

The TLR-8 Weapon Light/Laser runs on a single 3-volt CR123A lithium battery. It features a powerful LED delivering 4,300 candela and 500 lumens. Put in laymen’s terms, it’s going to temporarily blind anyone looking into a light so bright. The battery provides approximately 1.5 hours of constant light/strobe use and 18 hours of laser-only operation.

Mounting/removing of the TLR-8 is quick, easy and secure, and is easily accomplished with one hand — safely away from the muzzle. A “safe” lock feature keeps light/laser from activating prematurely for tactical or clandestine reasons.

A key kit is supplied to allow mounting to a large array of handguns of any light on the market.

The TLR-8 is constructed of 6000 series machined aircraft aluminum with a black anodized finish. Weight is a measly 2.64 oz., and length is 2.15″.
Give yourself the tactical edge with Streamlight’s TLR-8 Light/laser to illuminate and identify the threat.

The Streamlight TLR-8 Weapon Light System has an MSRP of $350.

For more details
Streamlight, Inc.
Ph: (800) 523-7488

You can purchase leather holsters from MTR Custom Leather for any weapon with the new Streamlight TLR-7 or TLR-8 (we carry all of the streamlight weapons). Check out www.mtrcustomleather.com choose your holster and design it and we will build it and ship it to you! If you have any issues please call (336)879-2166.

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Exclusive: Streamlight TLR-8 Weapon Light Series | American Handgunner

Viridian E Series Laser Sight- We make holsters for them all

Viridian E Series Laser Sight- We make holsters for them all

Viridian E SERIES red laser sights are essential for the everyday conceal and carry owner looking for an affordable price-point. They feature the most powerful red laser available and delivers rapid target acquisition when you need it most. With ambidextrous, button activation and a range of 25 yards in daylight and 1 mile at night, the E SERIES is the essential laser sight for your handgun.

Source: Viridian E Series Laser Sight Additional Information

New Weapons and Lasers Available for Holsters :) March 2018 

NEW WEAPONS FOR HOLSTERS:
  • CZ SHADOW 2 9MM
  • COLT PYTON 6″ .357
  • CZ 75 COMPACT P-01(C&L)
  • CZ 75D PCR COMPACT 9MM
  • CZ 97B (C&L)
  • CZ P-07 (C&L)
  • CZ P-09 (C&L)
  • Taurus PT111 Gen 2 Compact
  • S&W M&P Shield 40 performance center porter
  • GLOCK 37
  • HONOR DEFENSE HONOR GUARD 9MM SC LONG SLIDE
  • H&K VP9SK
  • S&W M&P 9 M2.0 4.25″
  • S&W M&P 9 M2.0 5″(AMBI SAFETY)
  • S&W M&P SHIELD M2.0 9MM THUMB SAFETY & RED LASER
  • S&W M&P M2.0 .40 COMPACT 4″
  • SPRINGFIELD 911 .380
  • 1911-6″ RAILED
  • SIG SAUER P365
  • KRISS SPHIX SDP COMPACT
  • PARA ORDNANCE 1911-5″ RAIL
  • DAN WESSON ELITE SERIES MODEL MAYHEM 1911-6″ HALF RAIL
  • TAURUS 66-4″
  • Coonan .357 Magnum Classic 5″
  • Sig Sauer P220 Long Version Hunter 5″ 10mm
  • STI 2011 Nitro 10
  • Sig Sauer P320 X Carry
  • Sig Sauer P320 X Five Fullsize
  • Wilson Combat EDC X9 (Railed/Nonrailed)
  • S&W TRP 8
NEW OPTICS FOR HOLSTERS:
  • Crimson Trace LG-485
  • Crimson Trace LG-485 G
  • Crimson Trace LG-482
  • Crimson Trace LG-497 G
  • Crimson Trace LG-362 G
  • Crimson Trace LG-807 G
  • Crimson Trace LG-497
  • Insight Laser for S7W Bodyguard 38
  • Inforce -APL-light (Fullsize only)
  • Truglo Micro Tac
  • Truglo Tru Point
  • Streamlight TLR-7
  • Streamlight TLR-8
  • Viridian RM 380
  • Lasermax SPS-C-G

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Campaign Overview | MailChimp

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