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Krakatau explodes – Aug 27, 1883 – 

The most powerful volcanic eruption in recorded history occurs on Krakatau (also called Krakatoa), a small, uninhabited volcanic island located west of Sumatra in Indonesia, on this day in 1883. Heard 3,000 miles away, the explosions threw five cubic miles of earth 50 miles into the air, created 120-foot tsunamis and killed 36,000 people.Krakatau exhibited its first stirrings in more than 200 years on May 20, 1883. A German warship passing by reported a seven-mile high cloud of ash and dust over Krakatau. For the next two months, similar explosions would be witnessed by commercial liners and natives on nearby Java and Sumatra. With little to no idea of the impending catastrophe, the local inhabitants greeted the volcanic activity with festive excitement.On August 26 and August 27, excitement turned to horror as Krakatau literally blew itself apart, setting off a chain of natural disasters that would be felt around the world for years to come. An enormous blast on the afternoon of August 26 destroyed the northern two-thirds of the island; as it plunged into the Sunda Strait, between the Java Sea and Indian Ocean, the gushing mountain generated a series of pyroclastic flows (fast-moving fluid bodies of molten gas, ash and rock) and monstrous tsunamis that swept over nearby coastlines. Four more eruptions beginning at 5:30 a.m. the following day proved cataclysmic. The explosions could be heard as far as 3,000 miles away, and ash was propelled to a height of 50 miles. Fine dust from the explosion drifted around the earth, causing spectacular sunsets and forming an atmospheric veil that lowered temperatures worldwide by several degrees.Of the estimated 36,000 deaths resulting from the eruption, at least 31,000 were caused by the tsunamis created when much of the island fell into the water. The greatest of these waves measured 120 feet high, and washed over nearby islands, stripping away vegetation and carrying people out to sea. Another 4,500 people were scorched to death from the pyroclastic flows that rolled over the sea, stretching as far as 40 miles, according to some sources.In addition to Krakatau, which is still active, Indonesia has another 130 active volcanoes, the most of any country in the world.

Source: Krakatau explodes – Aug 27, 1883 – HISTORY.com

New York Sergeant Who Shot Unarmed Man Is Fired Amid Investigation – The New York Times

After the off-duty shooting in Brooklyn, Sgt. Ritchard Blake was caught on video dropping a knife near the man and then picking it up again.

A police sergeant who was under investigation in connection with the off-duty shooting of an unarmed man in the face in Brooklyn was fired on Friday, a police official said.

Moments after the shooting on Aug. 2 in the East New York neighborhood, video surveillance footage captured the sergeant, Ritchard Blake, patting down the man, Thavone Santana, as if looking for a weapon.

The sergeant then pulled a sheath knife out of his back pocket and dropped it out of its covering beside Mr. Santana. After briefly pacing, Sergeant Blake picked it back up, the video shows.

Mr. Santana, 21, survived the shooting.

The surveillance video, which was described by two law enforcement officials and later posted by NBC New York, raised questions about what had happened, and the Brooklyn district attorney’s office said it would conduct “an independent and thorough” review.

Source: New York Sergeant Who Shot Unarmed Man Is Fired Amid Investigation – The New York Times

How to conceal a weapon while driving?-MTR Custom Leather tells all…Holster options for carrying a weapon in a vehicle or sitting. 

Concealment while walking is easier than driving in a vehicle. While it may be challenging to conceal your weapon when driving, there are a few things to consider doing to better assist you with concealing your weapon while driving.

Logically, first thing you think of is housing your weapon in a glove box or some sort of compartment in the vehicle. It’s a better fitment and comfortable for you. It’s the perfect shape and compartment to store a weapon and conceal it and it’s not too hard to access. While storing the weapon in the compartment, it should be retained in some sort of holster. The trigger of the weapon should always be covered while storing or wearing at all times. This is very important for safety reason. That’s a whole other topic. If you do decided to carry in a compartment or door compartment, please always use caution and practice drawing your weapon unloaded to work on your speed and accuracy in case of emergency. Attention and awareness should be taken to avoid excessive vibration, bouncing or movement while the vehicle is in motion or worst case scenario an accident.

On the other hand, there are many positions to carry a weapon on your body for concealment when standing, but while riding/driving may be a weird position or uncomfortable or even a struggle due to the seat belt. Wearing a holster in the appendix iwb may work for some depending on the size of the weapon and the person’s built, but for others it may not. So one may want to consider a crossdraw hip holster on the OWB like MTR’s A-8 Paddle holster. MTR’s paddle holster can be worn in several different positions due to the paddle on the back of the holster can be moved to adjust the ride height and the cant of the holster by easily using a screw driver. Being that it is a paddle holster, one can take on and off the holster fairly easily due to it clips inside of the pants while the holster sits on the OWB. A forward cant on a holster, can make it easier to sit and drive in a vehicle. Some may call this position an FBI cant or others call it a crossdraw.  MTR dose offer an A-1C Crossdraw holster that slides onto a belt and is about a 10-15 degree cant forward. This type of cant clears the direction of the seat belt and puts no pressure on the hip or gut while driving/sitting.

 A-3A Tuckable Adversay with Ulticlip3 Crossdraw IWB 

 A-8 Paddle

When driving a vehicle and trying to conceal the weapon, there are a few things to consider, one is the position of your body. Your posture can affect the comfort of a holster and concealment as well. Sitting straight up can cause pressure off the weapon and holster. Also, can cause less printing of the weapon through the shirt. A tip: some may recline the seat just a tab for better comfort and posture of the weapon on you. Secondly, keep in mind safety precautions. For instance, if you get stopped by police, one should communicate with the officer that the weapon is currently being stored in the compartment, whether it’s in a glove box, under the seat, door compartment or elsewhere BEFORE reaching for it. Upon communicating to the officer about your weapon, keep your hands in plain sight. Ask the officer how they wish to proceed about the weapon. Keep in mind that each state and country may have different laws and regulations concerning storage and concealment of weapons, whether it’s on you or being stored in a vehicle. So please do your thoroughly research before concealing your weapon.

 

Other Options:

 Consider a bag or purse, using MTR A-3A Tuckable Adversary with Ulticlip3 

 

Consider out Ukoalabags.. great for riding on bikes or motorcycles

 pocket holsters MTR B-7 Front Pocket Holster  or B-6 Back Pocket (cargo pocket, jacket pocket, etc)

 

 

 

 

 

Source: MTR Custom Leather,LLC

NRA Carry Guard Expo- Coming to Richmond VA

 

CONCEALED CARRY • PERSONAL PROTECTION • HOME DEFENSE

 

 

RICHMOND, VA | SEPTEMBER 14-16, 2018

 

JOIN US FOR THE 2ND ANNUAL NRA CARRY GUARD EXPO IN RICHMOND!

 Greater Richmond Convention Center, 403 N. 3rd Street, Richmond, VA 23219.

Box Office opens 8:30 am daily • Seminars & Workshops start as early as 8:00 am daily.

 

Join us for a three-day experience for individuals interested in increasing their knowledge and skills in personal protection, concealed carry and home defense.

You’ll find over 120 seminars and workshops on the best personal protection and concealed carry methods taught by best-in-class industry leaders, within an Exhibit Hall with leading firearm and accessory companies, showcasing their most advanced firearms and gear for self-defense and concealed carry.

Admission to the NRA Carry Guard Expo is OPEN TO THE PUBLIC with discounted ticket prices for NRA members. Admission ticket is good for all three days of the show!

Tickets are on sale now! Event registration and NRA membership sign-ups also take place on-site.

BUY TICKETS NOW!

 

Concealed Carry Policy

During the 2018 NRA Carry Guard Expo, lawfully carried firearms will be permitted in the Greater Richmond Convention Center in accordance with Virginia law. When carrying your firearm remember to follow all federal, state, and local laws.

Exhibit Hall Hours

Sep 14, Friday
10:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Sep 15, Saturday
10:00 AM – 6:00 PM
Sep 16, Sunday
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM

The NRA Carry Guard Expo is a 3 day educational and interactive experience dedicated to Individuals interested in increasing their knowledge and skills within personal protection, concealed carry and defense tactics.

Source: NRA Carry Guard Expo | Home

Smithsonian Institution created – Aug 10, 1846 – 

After a decade of debate about how best to spend a bequest left to America from an obscure English scientist, President James K. Polk signs the Smithsonian Institution Act into law.

In 1829, James Smithson died in Italy, leaving behind a will with a peculiar footnote. In the event that his only nephew died without any heirs, Smithson decreed that the whole of his estate would go to “the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an Establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge.” Smithson’s curious bequest to a country that he had never visited aroused significant attention on both sides of the Atlantic.

Smithson had been a fellow of the venerable Royal Society of London from the age of 22, publishing numerous scientific papers on mineral composition, geology, and chemistry. In 1802, he overturned popular scientific opinion by proving that zinc carbonates were true carbonate minerals, and one type of zinc carbonate was later named smithsonite in his honor.

Six years after his death, his nephew, Henry James Hungerford, indeed died without children, and on July 1, 1836, the U.S. Congress authorized acceptance of Smithson’s gift. President Andrew Jackson sent diplomat Richard Rush to England to negotiate for transfer of the funds, and two years later Rush set sail for home with 11 boxes containing a total of 104,960 gold sovereigns, 8 shillings, and 7 pence, as well as Smithson’s mineral collection, library, scientific notes, and personal effects. After the gold was melted down, it amounted to a fortune worth well over $500,000. After considering a series of recommendations, including the creation of a national university, a public library, or an astronomical observatory, Congress agreed that the bequest would support the creation of a museum, a library, and a program of research, publication, and collection in the sciences, arts, and history. On August 10, 1846, the act establishing the Smithsonian Institution was signed into law by President James K. Polk.

Today, the Smithsonian is composed of 19 museums and galleries including the recently announced National Museum of African American History and Culture,nine research facilities throughout the United States and the world, and the national zoo. Besides the original Smithsonian Institution Building, popularly known as the “Castle,” visitors to Washington, D.C., tour the National Museum of Natural History, which houses the natural science collections, the National Zoological Park, and the National Portrait Gallery. The National Museum of American History houses the original Star-Spangled Banner and other artifacts of U.S. history. The National Air and Space Museum has the distinction of being the most visited museum in the world, exhibiting such marvels of aviation and space history as the Wright brothers’ plane and Freedom 7, the space capsule that took the first American into space. John Smithson, the Smithsonian Institution’s great benefactor, is interred in a tomb in the Smithsonian Building.

Source: Smithsonian Institution created – Aug 10, 1846 – HISTORY.com

Ninth Circuit California Gun-Law Ruling: Good News for Second Amendment Rights | National Review

The stage may be set for Brett Kavanaugh’s first Second Amendment test as a justice.

Every now and then the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals — arguably the nation’s most progressive federal circuit — can offer up a legal surprise. Yesterday, it gave us a legal shock, when a divided panel of its judges affirmed last year’s federal district-court injunctiontemporarily blocking enforcement of California’s confiscatory ban on so-called large-capacity magazines.

Under California law, any person who possesses a legally purchased magazine capable of holding more than ten rounds of ammunition must either remove the magazine from the state, sell it to a licensed firearm dealer, or hand it over to law enforcement. Those citizens who retained their magazines after the law went into effect risked a fine or up to one year’s imprisonment in county jail.

The district court’s 66-page opinion was a legal tour-de-force that not only dismantled California’s justifications for the ban, but also reiterated and reinforced the constitutional and historical basis for the right to keep and bear arms. As I wrote last year, this paragraph from the district-court opinion is nearly-perfect:

Violent gun use is a constitutionally-protected means for law-abiding citizens to protect themselves from criminals. The phrase “gun violence” may not be invoked as a talismanic incantation to justify any exercise of state power. Implicit in the concept of public safety is the right of law-abiding people to use firearms and the magazines that make them work to protect themselves, their families, their homes, and their state against all armed enemies, foreign and domestic. To borrow a phrase, it would indeed be ironic if, in the name of public safety and reducing gun violence, statutes were permitted to subvert the public’s Second Amendment rights — which may repel criminal gun violence and which ultimately ensure the safety of the Republic.

Lest anyone think that the Ninth Circuit has suddenly discovered the original meaning of the Second Amendment, its ruling upholding the district-court injunction was limited. It merely held that the trial court didn’t abuse its discretion when it temporarily blocked enforcement of the law. But despite the limited holding, there was encouraging rhetoric in the court’s ruling.

For example, the appeals court held that the lower court “did not exceed its permissible discretion by concluding, based on those cases, that (1) some part of the Second Amendment right likely includes the right to bear a weapon ‘that has some reasonable relationship to the preservation or efficiency of a well regulated militia’ . . . and (2) the ammunition for a weapon is similar to the magazine for a weapon.”

Much of the modern argument over gun control revolves around the effort to label certain kinds of semi-automatic rifles (and magazines over ten rounds) as “military style” weapons that are effectively unprotected by the Second Amendment. Yet the Ninth Circuit’s language — rooted in the history of the amendment — links constitutional protection to a weapon’s potential militia use. In other words, the “military style” moniker actually connects the guns in question to the historic purpose of the right to bear arms.

If the Court takes the case (and that’s far from certain; SCOTUS has been reluctant to review recent Second Amendment decisions), it will have an opportunity to reset the gun-control debate.

Combine this standard with Heller’s clear statement that the Second Amendment was intended to protect weapons in “common use” for “lawful purposes like self defense,” and one begins to see that merely comparing AR-15s or Glocks to military weapons doesn’t render them unprotected. Instead, their common ownership, combined with their “reasonable relationship” to militia use, should enhance, not diminish, their constitutional status.

While gun owners in California can breathe a temporary sigh of relief, the fight is far from over. As David Kopel notes in a good piece over at Reason, California may petition for en banc review (don’t expect the wider panel of Ninth Circuit judges to rule so favorably), or the trial court may issue a permanent ruling in the weeks or months ahead. Either way — sooner or later — this case will reach the Supreme Court, and it may very well be Brett Kavanaugh’s first chance to look at a serious gun-rights cert petition, assuming he is confirmed to the Court.

If the Court takes the case (and that’s far from certain; SCOTUS has been reluctant to review recent Second Amendment decisions), it will have an opportunity to reset the gun-control debate. If it rules that weapons in common use for lawful purposes enjoy categorical constitutional protection, then most assault-weapons bans and large-capacity-magazine bans would fall. Prohibitions against the sale of “dangerous and unusual” weapons (machine guns, for example) would remain.

But all that’s speculation. For now, hundreds of thousands of California gun owners remain law-abiding. They don’t have to face the choice between surrendering the magazines that help keep their families safe and complying with a confiscatory law. Already, there were indications of passive resistance. As the Sacramento Bee reported last year, “Talk to gun owners, retailers and pro-gun sheriffs across California and you’ll get something akin to an eye roll when they’re asked if gun owners are going to voluntarily part with their property because Democratic politicians and voters who favor gun control outnumber them and changed the law.”

Gun-owners choose large-capacity magazines for good reasons, the same reasons why police carry large-capacity magazines in their service weapons. When a deadly encounter occurs, the amount of ammunition can make the difference between life and death. The state cannot be permitted to take a common means of self-defense from its citizens. Thankfully, even in the Ninth Circuit, confiscation has been held at bay.

The stage may be set for Brett Kavanaugh’s first Second Amendment test as a justice.

Source: Ninth Circuit California Gun-Law Ruling: Good News for Second Amendment Rights | National Review

FDR nominated for unprecedented third term – Jul 18, 1940 – 

On this day in 1940, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who first took office in 1933 as America’s 32nd president, is nominated for an unprecedentedthird term. Roosevelt, a Democrat, would eventually be elected to a record four terms in office, the only U.S. president to serve more than two terms.Roosevelt was born January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, New York, and went on to serve as a New York state senator from 1911 to 1913, assistant secretary of the Navy from 1913 to 1920 and governor of New York from 1929 to 1932. In 1932, he defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover to be elected president for the first time. During his first term, Roosevelt enacted his New Deal social programs, which were aimed at lifting America out of the Great Depression. In 1936, he won his second term in office by defeating Kansas governor Alf Landon in a landslide.On July 18, 1940, Roosevelt was nominated for a third presidential term at the Democratic Party convention in Chicago. The president received some criticism for running again because there was an unwritten rule in American politics that no U.S. president should serve more than two terms. Thecustom dated back to the country’s first president, George Washington, who in 1796 declined to run for a third term in office. Nevertheless, Roosevelt believed it was his duty to continue serving and lead his country through the mounting crisis in Europe, where Hitler’s Nazi Germany was on the rise. The president went on to defeat Republican Wendell Wilkie in the general election, and his third term in office was dominated by America’s involvement in World War II.In 1944, with the war still in progress, Roosevelt defeated New York governor Thomas Dewey for a fourth term in office. However, the president was unable to complete the full term. On April 12, 1945, Roosevelt, who had suffered from various health problems for years, died at age 63 in Warm Springs, Georgia. He was succeeded by Vice President Harry S. Truman. On March 21, 1947, Congress passed the 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which stated that no person could be elected to the office of president more than twice. The amendment was ratified by the required number of states in 1951.

Source: FDR nominated for unprecedented third term – Jul 18, 1940 – HISTORY.com

Atom bomb successfully tested – July 16, 1945 – HISTORY.com

On this day in 1945, at 5:29:45 a.m., the Manhattan Project comes to an explosive end as the first atom bomb is successfully tested in Alamogordo, New Mexico.

Plans for the creation of a uranium bomb by the Allies were established as early as 1939, when Italian emigre physicist Enrico Fermi met with U.S. Navy department officials at Columbia University to discuss the use of fissionable materials for military purposes. That same year, Albert Einstein wrote to President Franklin Roosevelt supporting the theory that an uncontrolled nuclear chain reaction had great potential as a basis for a weapon of mass destruction. In February 1940, the federal government granted a total of $6,000 for research. But in early 1942, with the United States now at war with the Axis powers, and fear mounting that Germany was working on its own uranium bomb, the War Department took a more active interest, and limits on resources for the project were removed.

Brigadier-General Leslie R. Groves, himself an engineer, was now in complete charge of a project to assemble the greatest minds in science and discover how to harness the power of the atom as a means of bringing the war to a decisive end. The Manhattan Project (so-called because of where the research began) would wind its way through many locations during the early period of theoretical exploration, most importantly, the University of Chicago, where Enrico Fermi successfully set off the first fission chain reaction. But the Project took final form in the desert of New Mexico, where, in 1943, Robert J. Oppenheimer began directing Project Y at a laboratory at Los Alamos, along with such minds as Hans Bethe, Edward Teller, and Fermi. Here theory and practice came together, as the problems of achieving critical mass-a nuclear explosion-and the construction of a deliverable bomb were worked out.

Finally, on the morning of July 16,in the New Mexico desert120 miles south of Santa Fe, the first atomic bomb was detonated. The scientists and a few dignitaries had removed themselves 10,000 yards away to observe as the first mushroom cloud of searing light stretched 40,000 feet into the air and generated the destructive power of 15,000 to 20,000 tons of TNT. The tower on which the bomb sat when detonated was vaporized.

The question now became-on whom was the bomb to be dropped? Germany was the original target, but the Germans had already surrendered. The only belligerent remaining was Japan.

A footnote: The original $6,000 budget for the Manhattan Project finally ballooned to a total cost of $2 billion.

Source: Atom bomb successfully tested – Jul 16, 1945 – HISTORY.com

National Simplicity Day – July 12 | National Today

National Simplicity Day – July 12

National Simplicity Day – July 12

It’s time to get back to basics and celebrate National Simplicity Day! The holiday falls every year on July 12 in honor of the birthday of Henry David Thoreau, who was born that day in 1817. Thoreau was a jack-of-all-trades — an author, an environmentalist, an abolitionist, a poet — but you probably remember him from your high school English class mainly as a transcendentalist. He and his contemporary transcendentalists believed, in simple (see what we did there?) terms, that people have knowledge about themselves that “transcends” all the external forces in their lives. They advocated for living a simpler life to better get in touch with those feelings. Now we’re not telling you to abandon your life and go live in the woods for a few years, but we love the idea of taking the day to evaluate your life and find out what elements of it are simply the most important to you. So read on for some modern-day tips on how to celebrate National Simplicity Day — as Thoreau himself said: “As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler.”

Source: National Simplicity Day – July 12 | National Today

Tickets On Sale to the NRA Carry Guard Expo-SEPTEMBER 14 – 16, 2018 | GREATER RICHMOND CONVENTION CENTER

SEPTEMBER 14 – 16, 2018   |   GREATER RICHMOND CONVENTION CENTER

 

                           THE FIREARMS EDUCATION EVENT OF THE YEAR!
Get the education and resources you need to responsibly defend yourself and your family at the only world-class exposition exclusively focused on concealed carry, personal protection and home defense.
Tickets On Sale Now
Open to the public with discounted rates for NRA members. Admission good for all 3 days of the Expo!
General Admission: $30
NRA Members: $20
NRA Life Members: $10
NRA Carry Guard Members: FREE
*Free admission with purchase or renewal of NRA membership

Source: Tickets On Sale to the NRA Carry Guard Expo

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