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Welcome to MTR Custom Leather’s Blog.

What’s the difference between the wide and thin version of the Beretta Tomcat 3032? 

Thus, eleven years after the Bobcat debuted, the beefed up .32 ACP Beretta 3032 Tomcat arrived. Too bad all that engineering didn’t work.

While the mass of the slide was increased to handle a cartridge with twice the power of the .25 ACP, and the frame strengthened with the revised trigger guard, these modifications still weren’t enough for the frame to reliably handle the battering from the slide. Internal cracking of the frame just above the trigger began showing up in many of the original Tomcats. These cracks were in a non-structural portion of the frame, but that did nothing to alleviate concerns from unhappy owners; and if the cracked metal displaced upward even slightly, the damaged frame would rub against the slide preventing proper cycling and causing jams.

The solution was to increase the slide mass even more to further reduce slide velocity. The result was the Beretta 3032 “wide slide” Tomcat. But not only was the slide widened, now matching the width of the grips, the side rails of the slide were also raised. The raised rail on the right side of the pistol is lowered forward of the breech face to accommodate ejection of the spent casing. If you happen upon a used Tomcat and want to know if it is an early version or a later wide-slide variant, just look for this area on the right side (see the photos below). On an original 3032 the right-side rail will have a uniform height the entire length. The wide-slide right rail will be lowered forward of the breech face.

Now for some interesting design notes and observations:

  1. The Tomcat is a true blow back design, clear down to case ejection. Look at the tipped-up barrel and you’ll notice something is missing. There’s no extractor. The spent case is blown out of the barrel rather than being pulled out at the end of an extractor hook
  2. The closed barrel is under tension from a leaf spring in the frame, so when the barrel release lever is pushed the barrel pivots upward with enough velocity to toss a loaded cartridge right out of the chamber. Considering that a standard “tap-rack-bang” drill won’t work in a gun that lacks an extractor, this is a rather ingenious solution to quickly removing a dud cartridge.
  3. The Tomcat lacks a decock, but that’s not a problem. If you want to safely decock the loaded weapon, just tilt the barrel, pull the trigger, and gently lower the hammer with your thumb (Beretta recommends against dry fire, so don’t let the hammer just fall). Using this procedure, it’s not even necessary to remove a loaded magazine to safely decock the weapon. Once the Tomcat is decocked, just push the barrel with the chambered round back into place.
  4. One other “missing” piece. Below is an image of the exposed frame and the underside of the slide. Notice that there is no recoil spring? Actually, there are two of them, but they are hidden behind the grips. When the slide travels rearward, two slots on the underneath sides of the slide engage levers on either side of the frame above the grips.  These levers compress the hidden recoil springs downward.

Beretta 3032 Tomcat specifications:

  • Trigger: Double-action/single-action; cocked-and-locked capable
  • Caliber: .32 ACP/7.65 mm
  • Capacity: 7+1
  • Steel slide, alloy frame
  • Length: 4.92 inches/125 millimeters
  • Width: 1.1 inches/28 mm
  • Height: 3.7 inches/94 mm
  • Weight with empty 7-round magazine (as measured by the author):
    • Early thin-slide Tomcat 14.38 ounces/408 grams
    • Later wide-slide Tomcat 15.72 ounces/446 grams
  • Barrel length: 2.4 inches/61 mm

After only two years of U.S. production the Model 21A Bobcat replaced the Model 20 in 1985. The Model 21A was available in both .25 ACP/6.35x16mmSR and .22 LR/5.6x15mmR (R = Rimmed cartridge). Some differences between the Model 21A and its predecessor:

  • An increase in grip length and girth
  • Increase in weight
  • Improved manual safety
  • Addition of a half-cock position
  • Matte finish replacing the previous high-gloss bluing
  • Stainless “INOX” version

Source: Pocket Pistol Week — Beretta Tomcat | R. Doug Wicker — Author

Do you know the difference between Leather dye and Leather paint?

Leather dye and leather paint are 2 main elements in the leather crafting world. They sound similar but the purpose is different.

Are you ready to talk about this difference with us?

Leather is like wood. It can be stained (dyed) or painted (pigmented finish or coating).

Leather dyes penetrate and accentuate the natural variations in the fiber. Dyes are in the leather   (chemical bond).

Leather paints and pigmented finishes coat the fiber; they are on the leather (a physical bond). They can be monochromatic or multiple colors, tones and effects.

Vinyl (a synthetic) cannot be dyed; it can only be refinished.

Dyes are prone to fading and transference (just as blue jeans can stain furniture). Most leathers are dyed. The variable that changes is the final finish. Some have no finish (aniline) or a light clear finish (semi-aniline). Some leathers (like those in auto interiors) have a pigmented urethane or acrylic finish that better retains color and resists stains.

Leather cannot be dyed lighter color. Only a pigmented finish (paint/coating) can achieve this.

Having said all of that in our products range you can find:

LEATHER EDGE PAINTS 

LEATHER DYES

The purpose is the same of what we were talking before, the first stays on top of the leather ( in this case leather edge), the second penetrates into the leather fibers.

Any questions on this topic?

Source: Do you know the difference between Leather dye and Leather paint?

Springfield Armory | 911 9mm Features

With a huge selection of pistols and rifles, Springfield Armory is the premier manufacturer of quality handguns for protection and competitive shooting.

Source: Springfield Armory | 911 9mm Features

Hellcat™ Series | Springfield Armory

 

After years of development, we are proud to introduce the Hellcat™, the highest capacity micro compact 9mm in the world and the next generation of defensive pistol from Springfield Armory.

The 3″ barreled micro compact pistol features a class leading capacity of 11+1 with its patented magazine — 13+1 with the included extended mag — and is the result of years of painstaking development and engineering in addition to intensive collaboration with top engineers, shooters and self defense experts.

In addition to minute dimensions and stunning capacity, the Hellcat offers a paradigm shifting approach to red dot sight integration for an EDC pistol. Offered in an Optical Sight Pistol configuration, the Hellcat OSP features a seamless cover plate that removes to allow direct mounting of a micro red dot to the slide for the lowest possible profile. The result? A micro sized pistol weighing in at a mere 17.9 oz. with capabilities previously reserved only for full size defensive handguns.

HELLCAT™ 3″ MICRO-COMPACT OSP™ 9MM

Source: Hellcat™ Series | Springfield Armory

How To Dye Leather

A Step-by-Step Guide for Leather Dyeing on Natural Leather

Infographic - How to Dye Leather

The process for leather dyeing is almost a standard process, anyway it can change in some steps depending on the type of leather dye you’re going to use.  To get a quality high-end finish on your natural leather,  there are different approaches, especially between water-based leather dyes and alcohol-based leather dyes.

This step-by-step guide will reveal you some tips that will help you get a high-end finish with good color consistency, uniform coating and a smooth surface.

STEP 1:

Pour the paint into a flat container

Water-based leather dye is a liquid with high viscosity, so for a more comfortable use of the paint, we suggest to drop it into a flat container such as a plastic dish or the lid of a bucket. Drop the leather dye into the container and wear gloves before you start the leather dyeing process.

how-to-dye-leather-step-1.jpg

STEP 2:

Apply leather dye with a circular movement

To proceed with the leather dye hand application you can use a sponge, a dauber or a soft cloth. Dip your tool into the paint and start applying it on the natural leather surface with circular movements. During the first application you’ll immediately notice that the paint is quickly absorbed by the leather. You should continue to apply it  on the whole leather surface until it will appear completely colored with a uniform coating.

how-to-dye-leather-step-2.jpg

STEP 3:

Let it dry and see the color changing

As you’re using a water-based product the drying phase will be slower that alcohol or solvent-based paint. It should take around 5 to 10 minutes and during this phase you’ll see the color on your leather surface changing and becoming more clear and more bright.

how-to-dye-leather-step-3.jpg

STEP 4:

Repeat the dyeing application by using less quantity

Once the first coat is completely dried you can proceed with the second application. This phase is not strictly necessary but is strongly recommended to give your color more consistency and to have a uniform coating on your leather surface. During the second application you may notice that the paint has more difficulty to penetrate the leather, because a good part is already full of paint.

how-to-dye-leather-step-4.jpg

STEP 5:

Remove the paint in excess before it dries

The paint that is not immediately absorbed by the leather could remain on the leather surface as liquid stripes. It’s very important to remove it before it dries otherwise your leather will not have a uniform aspect. To remove the paint in excess you can easily use the dry part of your sponge or a clean cloth.

how-to-dye-leather-step-5.jpg

STEP 6 (optional):

Use the fixative for extra-bond color

Depending on the type of natural leather you’re using, color may have different bonding. That’s why if you need the color to be well bonded to the leather surface, you can use the leather fixative as final coat.

Source: How To Dye Leather

10 Questions about Top Grain Leather

Top grain leather is one of the main leather grades. We have collected 10 of the most common questions about this Top Grain Leather.

1 – What is top grain leather?

Top grain leather is the second highest grade of leather. It has a uniform finish and is thinner and more workable than full grain leather, but it does not have its strength or durability.

Top_Grain_Leather_Duffle_Bag_Travel_Luggage_Sport_Bag_GLT082_7_1024x1024-1

2 – What does top grain leather look like?

The imperfections which occur naturally in full grain leather have been sanded away and the top

grain leather is imprinted with a regular imitation grain. The result is a smooth, uniformly patterned surface.

3 – Where does top grain leather come from?

There are 3 possible answers:

Where in the world does top grain leather come from?

The top six leather producing countries in the world are: China, India, Italy, Brazil, Korea and Russia. China produces 80% of the world’s leather.

Which animals are used in the production of leather?

Most leather is made from cows, because of their availability, their size and the quality of the leather. Leather can also be made from pigs, sheep, deer and horses. Small quantities of exotic leathers like a alligators, snakes, frogs and sting-rays.

>Where on the hide does top grain leather come from?

As its name suggests, top grain leather comes from the top of the hide, but several millimeters have been removed from the surface in order to eliminate imperfections.

4 – How is top grain leather made?

Several millimeters from the surface of the hide are sanded away, the leather is then buffed to create a smooth, blemish free surface.

5 – How to protect top grain leather

Top grain leather will have an aniline dye or a semi aniline dye. The leather should be nourished every three months, depending on the type of item and its usage.

Top_Grain_Leather_Duffle_Bag_Travel_Luggage_Sport_Bag_GLT082_7_1024x1024 copiaYou can also use a leather Conditioner, like the one we have in our stock, to give some more softness and care to the leather surface.

Disclaimer: You should always test any new products on a small inconspicuous area of the leather first, before applying all over, to ensure you are happy with any changes that may occur to the appearance and texture.

6 – How long will top grain leather lasts?

The life of your top grain leather will depend on the initial quality of the hide, the type of product and its usage and care. Obviously a Full grain leather will lasts longer, but top grain leather will last for a quite while too.

7 – How thick is top grain leather?

The thickness of an animal hide will depend on the type of animal. A cow hide, the most likely choice for top grain leather, is about 3/64thof an inch thick, the thickness of a coin.

8 – Can top grain leather peel?

Top grain leather which has a semi aniline dye and protective coating will peel over time.

9 – Can top grain leather be bonded?

Bonded leather is the lowest quality leather which is made by gluing scraps of leather together in the way that chipboard is made from scraps of wood. Top grain leather is not bonded, it is the top layer of the hide which has had surface imperfections removed.

10 – Common uses of top grain leather<

Top grain leather is soft and attractive and most of the common items we know are made with top grain leather.

Source: 10 Questions about Top Grain Leather

Leather Holsters Care and Maintenance

LEATHER CLEANING

Wipe down your leather products with a clean dry cloth after every use. A gentle cleansing with warm water and glycerin soap can be done if the leather becomes soiled. Brush on with a soft-bristled toothbrush, rinse and pad the leather with a dry cloth until it remains just slightly damp. Allow the product to air dry the rest of the way.

LEATHER STORAGE

When not in regular use, store your leather products in a cool, dry location. They can be wrapped in a soft cotton cloth and stored in their own box or hard case where you might keep clothing or important documents. Cool and dry is ideal. If you leave your handgun in the holster or other product, check it daily for moisture, condensation or corrosion. And remember to take your leather holster out of storage periodically to check its condition, wipe it down and remove any dust.

ADDITIONAL LEATHER TIPS

In addition to your regular cleaning routine, these tips will help you care for your leather products.

Use leather conditioners sparingly. Leather conditioners are specially formulated to loosen and moisturize leather as needed. Because MTR Custom leather is hand finished with our special leather dressing, should your leather product become dry or scratched, you can treat the exterior with a commercial leather dressing that does not contain lacquer. (Be careful when using Neat’s foot oil; large amounts will soften the leather.)

Protect leather from perspiration. Placing a barrier such as a t-shirt, coat or the waistband of your pants between your skin and your holster will ensure your leather holster is protected.

Treat the interior of your holster with spray silicone to help protect against excess moisture. Spray silicone also speeds the draw by reducing friction.

If your product becomes water-soaked, reshape it as best you can and allow it to air-dry at room temperature. Do not use a hot oven – it will shrink, harden and crack the leather.

Brass cartridges or other brass hardware when stored with leather will acquire a greenish residue called “verdigris.“ It is a natural product of a chemical reaction between brass and vegetable-tanned leather, and it wipes off.

To keep your leather goods in the best condition and allow them to age naturally and gracefully, avoid the following:

  • High humidity. Humidity can cause your leather product to mildew over time.
  • Direct sunlight and high heat. Direct sunlight and high heat can cause your leather holster and other products to become brittle and dry, and could cause the material to crack or fade. Changing atmospheric conditions, heavy perspiration and other factors could create such conditions.
  • Storing your leather goods in the trunk of your car, shed, garage or attic where heat or vermin/pests could be a factor.
  • Saddle soap or other conditions that could over soften the leather.
  • Areas of high salt content/sweat can degrade the leather quality.

MTR Custom leather holsters are available in a wide variety of types

Source: Leather Holsters Care and Maintenance

Gun news: The Guns of 2019 | Breach Bang Clear

2019 has already seen the introduction of several new models of firearm, a trend started in late 2018. We’ll be listing many of them out here.

Source: Gun news: The Guns of 2019 | Breach Bang Clear

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